Preliminary findings: Neural responses to feedback regarding betrayal and cooperation in adolescent anxiety disorders

Erin B. McClure-Tone, Norberto E. Nawa, Eric E. Nelson, Allison M. Detloff, Stephen J. Fromm, Daniel S. Pine, Monique Ernst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We compared neural and behavioral responses to feedback received during interpersonal interactions within the Prisoner's Dilemma game between adolescents with anxiety disorders (n = 12) and healthy peers (n = 17). Groups differed significantly in neural activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), precuneus, insula, and temporoparietal junction (TPJ). Anxious adolescents were also more likely than controls to cooperate after co-player betrayal. Our findings provide evidence that social behavior and related neural activity differs between anxious and healthy adolescents. These findings constitute a step toward elucidating neural correlates of social impairment in anxious youths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-472
Number of pages20
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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