Pregnant and Postpartum Women's Experiences and Perspectives on the Acceptability and Feasibility of Copackaged Medicine for Antenatal Care and PMTCT in Lesotho

Michelle M. Gill, Heather J. Hoffman, Appolinaire Tiam, Florence M. Mohai, Majoalane Mokone, Anthony Isavwa, Sesomo Mohale, Matela Makhohlisa, Victor Ankrah, Chewe Luo, Laura Guay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To improve PMTCT and antenatal care-related service delivery, a pack with centrally prepackaged medicine was rolled out to all pregnant women in Lesotho in 2011. This study assessed acceptability and feasibility of this copackaging mechanism for drug delivery among pregnant and postpartum women. Methods. Acceptability and feasibility were assessed in a mixed method, cross-sectional study through structured interviews (SI) and semistructured interviews (SSI) conducted in 2012 and 2013. Results. 290 HIV-negative women and 437 HIV-positive women (n = 727) participated. Nearly all SI participants found prepackaged medicines acceptable, though modifications such as size reduction of the pack were suggested. Positive experiences included that the pack helped women take pills as instructed and contents promoted healthy pregnancies. Negative experiences included inadvertent pregnancy disclosure and discomfort carrying the pack in communities. Implementation was also feasible; 85.2% of SI participants reported adequate counseling time, though 37.8% felt pack use caused clinic delays. SSI participants reported improvement in service quality following pack introduction, due to more comprehensive counseling. Conclusions. A prepackaged drug delivery mechanism for ANC/PMTCT medicines was acceptable and feasible. Findings support continued use of this approach in Lesotho with improved design modifications to reflect the current PMTCT program of lifelong treatment for all HIV-positive pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number435868
JournalAIDS Research and Treatment
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Lesotho
Prenatal Care
Postpartum Period
Pregnant Women
Medicine
Interviews
HIV
Counseling
Pregnancy
Disclosure
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Pregnant and Postpartum Women's Experiences and Perspectives on the Acceptability and Feasibility of Copackaged Medicine for Antenatal Care and PMTCT in Lesotho. / Gill, Michelle M.; Hoffman, Heather J.; Tiam, Appolinaire; Mohai, Florence M.; Mokone, Majoalane; Isavwa, Anthony; Mohale, Sesomo; Makhohlisa, Matela; Ankrah, Victor; Luo, Chewe; Guay, Laura.

In: AIDS Research and Treatment, Vol. 2015, 435868, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gill, MM, Hoffman, HJ, Tiam, A, Mohai, FM, Mokone, M, Isavwa, A, Mohale, S, Makhohlisa, M, Ankrah, V, Luo, C & Guay, L 2015, 'Pregnant and Postpartum Women's Experiences and Perspectives on the Acceptability and Feasibility of Copackaged Medicine for Antenatal Care and PMTCT in Lesotho', AIDS Research and Treatment, vol. 2015, 435868. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/435868
Gill, Michelle M. ; Hoffman, Heather J. ; Tiam, Appolinaire ; Mohai, Florence M. ; Mokone, Majoalane ; Isavwa, Anthony ; Mohale, Sesomo ; Makhohlisa, Matela ; Ankrah, Victor ; Luo, Chewe ; Guay, Laura. / Pregnant and Postpartum Women's Experiences and Perspectives on the Acceptability and Feasibility of Copackaged Medicine for Antenatal Care and PMTCT in Lesotho. In: AIDS Research and Treatment. 2015 ; Vol. 2015.
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abstract = "Objective. To improve PMTCT and antenatal care-related service delivery, a pack with centrally prepackaged medicine was rolled out to all pregnant women in Lesotho in 2011. This study assessed acceptability and feasibility of this copackaging mechanism for drug delivery among pregnant and postpartum women. Methods. Acceptability and feasibility were assessed in a mixed method, cross-sectional study through structured interviews (SI) and semistructured interviews (SSI) conducted in 2012 and 2013. Results. 290 HIV-negative women and 437 HIV-positive women (n = 727) participated. Nearly all SI participants found prepackaged medicines acceptable, though modifications such as size reduction of the pack were suggested. Positive experiences included that the pack helped women take pills as instructed and contents promoted healthy pregnancies. Negative experiences included inadvertent pregnancy disclosure and discomfort carrying the pack in communities. Implementation was also feasible; 85.2{\%} of SI participants reported adequate counseling time, though 37.8{\%} felt pack use caused clinic delays. SSI participants reported improvement in service quality following pack introduction, due to more comprehensive counseling. Conclusions. A prepackaged drug delivery mechanism for ANC/PMTCT medicines was acceptable and feasible. Findings support continued use of this approach in Lesotho with improved design modifications to reflect the current PMTCT program of lifelong treatment for all HIV-positive pregnant women.",
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