Pregnancy Outcomes in US Prisons, 2016-2017

Carolyn Sufrin, Lauren Beal, Jennifer Clarke, Rachel Jones, William D. Mosher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To collect national data on pregnancy frequencies and outcomes among women in US state and federal prisons. METHODS: From 2016 to 2017, we prospectively collected 12 months of pregnancy statistics from a geographically diverse sample of 22 state prison systems and the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Prisons reported numbers of pregnant women, births, miscarriages, abortions, and other outcomes. RESULTS: Overall, 1396 pregnant women were admitted to prisons; 3.8% of newly admitted women and 0.6% of all women were pregnant in December 2016. There were 753 live births (92% of outcomes), 46 miscarriages (6%), 11 abortions (1%), 4 stillbirths (0.5%), 3 newborn deaths, and no maternal deaths. Six percent of live births were preterm and 30% were cesarean deliveries. Distributions of outcomes varied by state. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the majority of prison pregnancies ended in live births or miscarriages. Our findings can enable policymakers, researchers, and public health practitioners to optimize health outcomes for incarcerated pregnant women and their newborns, whose health has broad sociopolitical implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)799-805
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume109
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Prisons
Pregnancy Outcome
Pregnant Women
Live Birth
Spontaneous Abortion
Pregnancy
Maternal Death
Stillbirth
Public Health
Research Personnel
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Pregnancy Outcomes in US Prisons, 2016-2017. / Sufrin, Carolyn; Beal, Lauren; Clarke, Jennifer; Jones, Rachel; Mosher, William D.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 109, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 799-805.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sufrin, C, Beal, L, Clarke, J, Jones, R & Mosher, WD 2019, 'Pregnancy Outcomes in US Prisons, 2016-2017', American journal of public health, vol. 109, no. 5, pp. 799-805. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2019.305006
Sufrin, Carolyn ; Beal, Lauren ; Clarke, Jennifer ; Jones, Rachel ; Mosher, William D. / Pregnancy Outcomes in US Prisons, 2016-2017. In: American journal of public health. 2019 ; Vol. 109, No. 5. pp. 799-805.
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