Prefrontal cortex and somatosensory cortex in tactile crossmodal association: An independent component analysis of ERP recordings

Yixuan Ku, Shinji Ohara, Liping Wang, Frederick Lenz, Steven S. Hsiao, Mark Bodner, Bo Hong, Yong Di Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our previous studies on scalp-recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) showed that somatosensory N140 evoked by a tactile vibration in working memory tasks was enhanced when human subjects expected a coming visual stimulus that had been paired with the tactile stimulus. The results suggested that such enhancement represented the cortical activities involved in tactile-visual crossmodal association. In the present study, we further hypothesized that the enhancement represented the neural activities in somatosensory and frontal cortices in the crossmodal association. By applying independent component analysis (ICA) to the ERP data, we found independent components (ICs) located in the medial prefrontal cortex (around the anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) and the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). The activity represented by the IC in SI cortex showed enhancement in expectation of the visual stimulus. Such differential activity thus suggested the participation of SI cortex in the task-related crossmodal association. Further, the coherence analysis and the Granger causality spectral analysis of the ICs showed that SI cortex appeared to cooperate with ACC in attention and perception of the tactile stimulus in crossmodal association. The results of our study support with new evidence an important idea in cortical neurophysiology: higher cognitive operations develop from the modality-specific sensory cortices (in the present study, SI cortex) that are involved in sensation and perception of various stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere771
JournalPLoS One
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 2007

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Neurophysiology
Somatosensory Cortex
Independent component analysis
Touch
Prefrontal Cortex
Evoked Potentials
Spectrum analysis
cortex
Data storage equipment
Gyrus Cinguli
Touch Perception
Frontal Lobe
Vibration
Scalp
Short-Term Memory
Causality
neurophysiology
prefrontal cortex
vibration
spectral analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prefrontal cortex and somatosensory cortex in tactile crossmodal association : An independent component analysis of ERP recordings. / Ku, Yixuan; Ohara, Shinji; Wang, Liping; Lenz, Frederick; Hsiao, Steven S.; Bodner, Mark; Hong, Bo; Zhou, Yong Di.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 2, No. 8, e771, 22.08.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ku, Yixuan ; Ohara, Shinji ; Wang, Liping ; Lenz, Frederick ; Hsiao, Steven S. ; Bodner, Mark ; Hong, Bo ; Zhou, Yong Di. / Prefrontal cortex and somatosensory cortex in tactile crossmodal association : An independent component analysis of ERP recordings. In: PLoS One. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 8.
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