Predictors of treatment failure for non-severe childhood pneumonia in developing countries - systematic literature review and expert survey - the first step towards a community focused mHealth risk-assessment tool?

Eric McCollum, Carina King, Robert Hollowell, Janet Zhou, Tim Colbourn, Bejoy Nambiar, David Mukanga, Deborah C Hay Burgess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Improved referral algorithms for children with non-severe pneumonia at the community level are desirable. We sought to identify predictors of oral antibiotic failure in children who fulfill the case definition of World Health Organization (WHO) non-severe pneumonia. Predictors of greatest interest were those not currently utilized in referral algorithms and feasible to obtain at the community level. Methods: We systematically reviewed prospective studies reporting independent predictors of oral antibiotic failure for children 2-59 months of age in resource-limited settings with WHO non-severe pneumonia (either fast breathing for age and/or lower chest wall indrawing without danger signs), with an emphasis on predictors not currently utilized for referral and reasonable for community health workers. We searched PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase and qualitatively analyzed publications from 1997-2014. To supplement the limited published evidence in this subject area we also surveyed respiratory experts. Results: Nine studies met criteria, seven of which were performed in south Asia. One eligible study occurred exclusively at the community level. Overall, oral antibiotic failure rates ranged between 7.8-22.9%. Six studies found excess age-adjusted respiratory rate (either WHO-defined very fast breathing for age or 10-15 breaths/min faster than normal WHO age-adjusted thresholds) and four reported young age as predictive for oral antibiotic failure. Of the seven predictors identified by the expert panel, abnormal oxygen saturation and malnutrition were most highly favored per the panel's rankings and comments. Conclusions: This review identified several candidate predictors of oral antibiotic failure not currently utilized in childhood pneumonia referral algorithms; excess age-specific respiratory rate, young age, abnormal oxygen saturation, and moderate malnutrition. However, the data was limited and there are clear evidence gaps; research in rural, low-resource settings with community health workers is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number74
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 9 2015

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Telemedicine
Treatment Failure
Developing Countries
Pneumonia
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Referral and Consultation
Respiratory Rate
Malnutrition
Respiration
Oxygen
Thoracic Wall
PubMed
Publications
Surveys and Questionnaires
Prospective Studies
Research

Keywords

  • Childhood pneumonia
  • Community health workers
  • Developing countries
  • Integrated community case management (iCCM)
  • mHealth
  • Pediatrics
  • Predictors
  • Treatment failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Predictors of treatment failure for non-severe childhood pneumonia in developing countries - systematic literature review and expert survey - the first step towards a community focused mHealth risk-assessment tool? / McCollum, Eric; King, Carina; Hollowell, Robert; Zhou, Janet; Colbourn, Tim; Nambiar, Bejoy; Mukanga, David; Burgess, Deborah C Hay.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 15, No. 1, 74, 09.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Predictors of treatment failure for non-severe childhood pneumonia in developing countries - systematic literature review and expert survey - the first step towards a community focused mHealth risk-assessment tool?",
abstract = "Background: Improved referral algorithms for children with non-severe pneumonia at the community level are desirable. We sought to identify predictors of oral antibiotic failure in children who fulfill the case definition of World Health Organization (WHO) non-severe pneumonia. Predictors of greatest interest were those not currently utilized in referral algorithms and feasible to obtain at the community level. Methods: We systematically reviewed prospective studies reporting independent predictors of oral antibiotic failure for children 2-59 months of age in resource-limited settings with WHO non-severe pneumonia (either fast breathing for age and/or lower chest wall indrawing without danger signs), with an emphasis on predictors not currently utilized for referral and reasonable for community health workers. We searched PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase and qualitatively analyzed publications from 1997-2014. To supplement the limited published evidence in this subject area we also surveyed respiratory experts. Results: Nine studies met criteria, seven of which were performed in south Asia. One eligible study occurred exclusively at the community level. Overall, oral antibiotic failure rates ranged between 7.8-22.9{\%}. Six studies found excess age-adjusted respiratory rate (either WHO-defined very fast breathing for age or 10-15 breaths/min faster than normal WHO age-adjusted thresholds) and four reported young age as predictive for oral antibiotic failure. Of the seven predictors identified by the expert panel, abnormal oxygen saturation and malnutrition were most highly favored per the panel's rankings and comments. Conclusions: This review identified several candidate predictors of oral antibiotic failure not currently utilized in childhood pneumonia referral algorithms; excess age-specific respiratory rate, young age, abnormal oxygen saturation, and moderate malnutrition. However, the data was limited and there are clear evidence gaps; research in rural, low-resource settings with community health workers is needed.",
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AB - Background: Improved referral algorithms for children with non-severe pneumonia at the community level are desirable. We sought to identify predictors of oral antibiotic failure in children who fulfill the case definition of World Health Organization (WHO) non-severe pneumonia. Predictors of greatest interest were those not currently utilized in referral algorithms and feasible to obtain at the community level. Methods: We systematically reviewed prospective studies reporting independent predictors of oral antibiotic failure for children 2-59 months of age in resource-limited settings with WHO non-severe pneumonia (either fast breathing for age and/or lower chest wall indrawing without danger signs), with an emphasis on predictors not currently utilized for referral and reasonable for community health workers. We searched PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase and qualitatively analyzed publications from 1997-2014. To supplement the limited published evidence in this subject area we also surveyed respiratory experts. Results: Nine studies met criteria, seven of which were performed in south Asia. One eligible study occurred exclusively at the community level. Overall, oral antibiotic failure rates ranged between 7.8-22.9%. Six studies found excess age-adjusted respiratory rate (either WHO-defined very fast breathing for age or 10-15 breaths/min faster than normal WHO age-adjusted thresholds) and four reported young age as predictive for oral antibiotic failure. Of the seven predictors identified by the expert panel, abnormal oxygen saturation and malnutrition were most highly favored per the panel's rankings and comments. Conclusions: This review identified several candidate predictors of oral antibiotic failure not currently utilized in childhood pneumonia referral algorithms; excess age-specific respiratory rate, young age, abnormal oxygen saturation, and moderate malnutrition. However, the data was limited and there are clear evidence gaps; research in rural, low-resource settings with community health workers is needed.

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KW - Treatment failure

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