Predictors of success or failure of transition to day hospital treatment for inpatients with anorexia nervosa

William T. Howard, Karen K. Evans, Charito V. Quintero-Howard, Wayne A. Bowers, Arnold E. Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Clinicians are under increasing pressure to transfer inpatients with anorexia nervosa to less intensive treatment early in their hospital course. This study identifies prognostic factors clinicians can use in determining the earliest time to transfer an inpatient with anorexia to a day hospital program. Method: The authors reviewed the charts of 59 female patients with anorexia nervosa who were transferred from 24-hour inpatient care to an eating disorder day hospital program. They evaluated the prognostic significance of a variety of anthropometric, demographic, illness history, and psychometric measures in this retrospective chart review. Results: Greater risk of day hospital program treatment failure and inpatient readmission was associated with longer duration of illness (for patients who had been ill for more than 6 years, risk ratio=2.7), amenorrhea (for patients who had this symptom for more than 2.5 years, risk ratio=5.7), or lower body mass index at the time of inpatient admission (for patients with a body mass index of 16.5 or less, risk ratio=9.6; for those with a body mass index 75% or less than normal, risk ratio=7.2) or at the time of transition to the day hospital program (for patients with a body mass index of 19 or less, risk ratio=3.9; for those with a body mass index 90% or less than normal, risk ratio=11.7). Conclusions: Inpatients with anoreXia nervosa who have the poor prognostic indicators found in this study are in need of continued inpatient care to avoid immediate relapse and higher cost and longer duration of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1697-1702
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume156
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Anorexia Nervosa
Inpatients
Odds Ratio
Body Mass Index
Therapeutics
Patient Admission
Amenorrhea
Anorexia
Treatment Failure
Psychometrics
History
Demography
Pressure
Costs and Cost Analysis
Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Howard, W. T., Evans, K. K., Quintero-Howard, C. V., Bowers, W. A., & Andersen, A. E. (1999). Predictors of success or failure of transition to day hospital treatment for inpatients with anorexia nervosa. American Journal of Psychiatry, 156(11), 1697-1702.

Predictors of success or failure of transition to day hospital treatment for inpatients with anorexia nervosa. / Howard, William T.; Evans, Karen K.; Quintero-Howard, Charito V.; Bowers, Wayne A.; Andersen, Arnold E.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 156, No. 11, 11.1999, p. 1697-1702.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howard, WT, Evans, KK, Quintero-Howard, CV, Bowers, WA & Andersen, AE 1999, 'Predictors of success or failure of transition to day hospital treatment for inpatients with anorexia nervosa', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 156, no. 11, pp. 1697-1702.
Howard WT, Evans KK, Quintero-Howard CV, Bowers WA, Andersen AE. Predictors of success or failure of transition to day hospital treatment for inpatients with anorexia nervosa. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1999 Nov;156(11):1697-1702.
Howard, William T. ; Evans, Karen K. ; Quintero-Howard, Charito V. ; Bowers, Wayne A. ; Andersen, Arnold E. / Predictors of success or failure of transition to day hospital treatment for inpatients with anorexia nervosa. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 1999 ; Vol. 156, No. 11. pp. 1697-1702.
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