Predictors of Satisfying and Impactful Clinical Shadowing Experiences for Underrepresented Minority High School Students Interested in Healthcare Careers

Karla Kendrick, Stephanie Withey, Alex Batson, Scott M. Wright, Paul O'Rourke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Diversity among healthcare professionals lags behind the increasing racial and ethnic diversity of the United States’ population. Increasing diversity of the health professional workforce may be one strategy to influence healthcare disparities. This study sought to understand factors associated with highly satisfying and impactful clinical shadowing experiences among underrepresented minority (URM) students in a health professional development program for urban high school students. Methods: We analyzed data from students’ summer clinical shadowing experiences in 2016 and 2017. We sought to determine if preceptor factors (e.g. racial and gender concordance with students), or patient related variables (e.g. racial concordance with students, the volume of patients per session) were associated with overall satisfaction with shadowing, the desire to pursue a similar career as their preceptor, and viewing their preceptor as a role model. After each shadowing experience, students completed evaluation forms. Chi-square tests were used for data analysis. Results: Over two summers, 65 high school juniors participated in an average of 14 half-day clinical shadowing sessions; 59 of these students identify as URMs. Among URM students, racial/ethnic concordance between preceptor and student was significantly associated with viewing the preceptor as a role model (p = 0.028). Witnessing a greater number of patient-provider encounters (≥five patients per session) was associated with higher satisfaction with the experience (p = 0.0002), and viewing the preceptor as a role model (p = 0.04). Conclusion: To increase diversity of the healthcare workforce, URM students need high volume patient-provider encounters. Racial and/or ethnic concordance of URM students and preceptors may provide for preferable role models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-386
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume112
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Diversity
  • Health professions
  • Health professions development
  • High school students
  • Inner city youth
  • Summer shadowing
  • Underrepresented minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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