Predictors of plasma cell disorders among African American patients: A community practice perspective

Nay Min Tun, Gardith Joseph, Aye Min Soe, Jean G. Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

African Americans have two- to three-fold higher incidence of multiple myeloma and MGUS compared to other ethnic groups in the USA. Some physicians often perform diagnostic evaluations for plasma cell disorders (PCD) in African American patients on the basis of hematological abnormalities (thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, etc.) even in the absence of traditional triggers such as anemia, renal impairment, hypercalcemia, hyperglobulinemia, and lytic bone disease. Whether these nontraditional triggers have any significant association with PCD in African American population is not known. In addition, whether this approach could detect more asymptomatic PCD than black population prevalence is questionable. Moreover, the association between traditional triggers and PCD particularly in blacks has not been clearly delineated. Hence, we have carried out a retrospective study in an attempt to answer these questions. Two hundred fifty-four patients were eligible. Multiple myeloma workup based on parameters other than traditional triggers did not detect more asymptomatic PCD than what is expected of black population prevalence (p=0.19). Of traditional triggers, the finding of only anemia or hyperglobulinemia seemed to be nonspecific in black population (p=0.17 and 0.85, respectively). However, the presence of serum creatinine >2 mg/dL or corrected serum calcium >10.5 mg/dL or a combination of traditional triggers appeared to be strongly predictive of PCD (odds ratio of 6.9, 4.2, and 3, respectively). The number of trigger variables was positively correlated with the likelihood of PCD (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1015-1021
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Hematology
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Plasma Cells
African Americans
Multiple Myeloma
Population
Anemia
Bone Diseases
Leukopenia
Hypercalcemia
Serum
Ethnic Groups
Thrombocytopenia
Creatinine
Retrospective Studies
Odds Ratio
Calcium
Physicians
Kidney
Incidence

Keywords

  • African American
  • MGUS
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Plasma cell disorders
  • Predictors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Predictors of plasma cell disorders among African American patients : A community practice perspective. / Tun, Nay Min; Joseph, Gardith; Soe, Aye Min; Ford, Jean G.

In: Annals of Hematology, Vol. 93, No. 6, 2014, p. 1015-1021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tun, Nay Min ; Joseph, Gardith ; Soe, Aye Min ; Ford, Jean G. / Predictors of plasma cell disorders among African American patients : A community practice perspective. In: Annals of Hematology. 2014 ; Vol. 93, No. 6. pp. 1015-1021.
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