Predictors of low-density lipoprotein particle size in a high-risk African-American population

Jeana L. Benton, Roger S Blumenthal, Diane M Becker, Lisa Yanek, Taryn F. Moy, Wendy S Post

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A predominance of small, dense, low-density lipoprotein particles (pattern B) has been associated with increased cardiovascular risk independent of absolute cholesterol levels in primarily white populations. Because of the putative association of pattern B with increased risk, some investigators have proposed that routine measurement of low-density lipoprotein particle size may be beneficial for cardiovascular risk assessment. Because no studies have specifically examined this possibility in African-Americans, it remains unclear whether measurement of low-density lipoprotein particle size adds information beyond that of traditional lipid risk factors. We compared standard lipid profile measurements with extended measurements concurrently in an apparently healthy, high-risk population of African-American siblings of patients who had premature cardiovascular disease. We determined the extent to which patients who had pattern B would be identifiable from the usual lipid profile. A high triglyceride level alone was a strong independent correlate of pattern B. In subjects whose triglyceride level was ≥150 mg/dl, 67% had pattern B, whereas only 17% of subjects whose triglyceride level was

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1320-1323
Number of pages4
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume95
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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LDL Lipoproteins
Particle Size
African Americans
Triglycerides
Lipids
Population
Siblings
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cholesterol
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Predictors of low-density lipoprotein particle size in a high-risk African-American population. / Benton, Jeana L.; Blumenthal, Roger S; Becker, Diane M; Yanek, Lisa; Moy, Taryn F.; Post, Wendy S.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 95, No. 11, 01.06.2005, p. 1320-1323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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