Predictors of isoniazid preventive therapy completion among adults newly diagnosed with HIV in rural Malawi

K. M. Little, M. Khundi, G. L. Barnes, L. G. Ngwira, A. Nkhoma, S. Makombe, E. L. Corbett, R. E. Chaisson, D. W. Dowdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

S E T T ING: To reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the World Health Organization recommends at least 6 months of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). Completion of IPT remains a major challenge in resource-limited settings. OBJECTIVE : To evaluate predictors of IPT completion in individuals newly diagnosed with HIV. DESIGN: Predictors of IPT completion among adults newly diagnosed with HIV in rural Malawi were evaluated using a multilevel logistic regression model. RESULT S : Of 974 participants who screened negative for active TB and were started on IPT, 732 (75%) completed treatment. Only one IPT-eligible individual refused treatment. Participants who were aged ,25 years (compared with those aged 745 years, adjusted OR [aOR] 0.33, 95%CI 0.18-0.60) and male (compared to non-pregnant females, aOR 0.57, 95%CI 0.37- 0.88) had lower odds of IPT completion. CONCLUS ION: IPT provision at the time of initial HIV diagnosis was highly acceptable in rural Malawi; three quarters of those who initiated IPT successfully completed therapy. We observed lower odds of completion among males and among female participants aged ,25 years. Additional efforts may be needed to ensure IPT completion among males and young females who have recently been diagnosed with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-377
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Keywords

  • Co-infection
  • IPT
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Infectious Diseases

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