Predictors of Depression Symptoms Among Low-Income Women Exposed to Perinatal Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)

Jennifer C. Kastello, Kathryn H. Jacobsen, Kathleen F. Gaffney, Marie P. Kodadek, Phyllis W. Sharps, Linda C. Bullock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Women experiencing perinatal intimate partner violence (IPV) may be at increased risk for depression. Baseline data was analyzed from 239 low-income pregnant women participating in an intervention study designed to reduce exposure to IPV. Depression risk was assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and IPV factors were measured with the Conflict Tactics Scale-Revised (CTS-2). Stepwise regression was conducted to identify predictors of risk for depression. Race (p = 0.028), psychological IPV (p = 0.035) and sexual IPV (p = 0.031) were strongly associated with risk for depression. Regression results indicated that women experiencing severe psychological IPV were more likely to develop depression (OR 3.16, 95 % CI 1.246, 8.013) than those experiencing severe physical or sexual IPV. Experiencing severe psychological IPV during pregnancy is strongly linked to risk for depression. Routine screening for psychological IPV may increase identification and treatment of women at high risk for depression during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-690
Number of pages8
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Pregnancy
  • Psychological IPV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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