Predictors for treating obstructive sleep apnea with an open nasal cannula system (transnasal insufflation)

Georg Nilius, Thomas Wessendorf, Joachim Maurer, Riccardo Stoohs, Susheel Patil, Norman Schubert, Hartmut Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although continuous positive airway pressure effectively treats OSA, compliance is variable because of the encumbrance of wearing a sealed nasal mask throughout sleep. In a small group of patients, it was recently shown that an open nasal cannula (transnasal insuffl ation [TNI]) can treat OSA. The aim of this larger study was to find predictors for treatment responses with TNI. Methods: Standard sleep studies with and without TNI were performed in 56 patients with a wide spectrum of disease severity. A therapeutic response was defined as a reduction of the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) below 10 events/h associated with a 50% reduction of the event rate from baseline and was used to identify subgroups of patients particularly responsive or resistant to TNI treatment. Results: For the entire group (N = 56), TNI decreased the RDI from 22.6±15.6 to 17.2±13.2 events/h(P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-528
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume137
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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Insufflation
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Sleep
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Masks
Nose
Compliance
Therapeutics
Morbidity
Mortality
Cannula

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Nilius, G., Wessendorf, T., Maurer, J., Stoohs, R., Patil, S., Schubert, N., & Schneider, H. (2010). Predictors for treating obstructive sleep apnea with an open nasal cannula system (transnasal insufflation). Chest, 137(3), 521-528. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.09-0357

Predictors for treating obstructive sleep apnea with an open nasal cannula system (transnasal insufflation). / Nilius, Georg; Wessendorf, Thomas; Maurer, Joachim; Stoohs, Riccardo; Patil, Susheel; Schubert, Norman; Schneider, Hartmut.

In: Chest, Vol. 137, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 521-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nilius, G, Wessendorf, T, Maurer, J, Stoohs, R, Patil, S, Schubert, N & Schneider, H 2010, 'Predictors for treating obstructive sleep apnea with an open nasal cannula system (transnasal insufflation)', Chest, vol. 137, no. 3, pp. 521-528. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.09-0357
Nilius, Georg ; Wessendorf, Thomas ; Maurer, Joachim ; Stoohs, Riccardo ; Patil, Susheel ; Schubert, Norman ; Schneider, Hartmut. / Predictors for treating obstructive sleep apnea with an open nasal cannula system (transnasal insufflation). In: Chest. 2010 ; Vol. 137, No. 3. pp. 521-528.
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