Predictive malaria risk and uncertainty mapping in Nchelenge District, Zambia: Evidence of widespread, persistent risk and implications for targeted interventions

Jessie Pinchoff, Mike Chaponda, Timothy Shields, James Lupiya, Tamaki Kobayashi, Modest Mulenga, William J. Moss, Frank C. Curriero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Malaria risk maps may be used to guide policy decisions on whether vector control interventions should be targeted and, if so, where. Active surveillance for malaria was conducted through household surveys in Nchelenge District, Zambia from April 2012 through December 2014. Households were enumerated based on satellite imagery and randomly selected for study enrollment. At each visit, participants were administered a questionnaire and a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Logistic regression models were used to construct spatial prediction risk maps and maps of risk uncertainty. A total of 461 households were visited, comprising 1,725 participants, of whom 48% were RDT positive. Several environmental features were associated with increased household malaria risk in a multivariable logistic regression model adjusting for seasonal variation. The model was validated using both internal and external evaluation measures to generate and assess root mean square error, as well as sensitivity and specificity for predicted risk. The final, validated model was used to predict and map malaria risk including a measure of risk uncertainty. Malaria risk in a high, perennial transmission setting is widespread but heterogeneous at a local scale, with seasonal variation. Targeting malaria control interventions may not be appropriate in this epidemiological setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1260-1267
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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