Predicting the outcome of cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer a review

Okechukwu A. Ibeanu, Robert E. Bristow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer-related mortality in the United States. Surgical cytoreduction is the cornerstone of current treatment in patients with advanced disease, but it offers the best chances for overall survival when optimal cytoreduction is achieved. Clinicopathological and radiological models for predicting optimal resectability have not been universally applicable. Objective: To summarize the existing surgical data on current serologic, radiological, and surgical tools used to predict the resectability of advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: Systematic review of surgical studies on primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer reported in the English-language literature between 1980 and 2009. Results: Seventeen retrospective studies using cancer antigen 125, and8 retrospective studies using radiological imaging modalities to predict resectability of advanced ovarian cancer were reviewed. Five laparoscopic-based reports of ovarian cancer resectability were also reviewed as well as 5 studies examining the role of clinicopathological variables affecting surgical cytoreductive ability. These studies were analyzed according to the rate of optimal cytoreduction achieved and the reported sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values of predictive parameters described. Finally, the various conclusions were compared. Conclusions: The rates of optimal cytoreduction vary among surgeons. A universally applicable clinical model that can predict which patients will undergo optimal cytoreduction remains elusive. More research is needed to devise a set of uniform criteria that can be used to predict ovarian cancer resectability among different patient populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume20
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Ovarian Neoplasms
Retrospective Studies
Aptitude
Neoplasms
Language
Antigens
Sensitivity and Specificity
Survival
Mortality
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Cytoreduction
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Surgery outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Predicting the outcome of cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer a review. / Ibeanu, Okechukwu A.; Bristow, Robert E.

In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, Vol. 20, No. SUPPL.1, 01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{758c60ca6ac6499d9b6f32f2051b86af,
title = "Predicting the outcome of cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer a review",
abstract = "Introduction: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer-related mortality in the United States. Surgical cytoreduction is the cornerstone of current treatment in patients with advanced disease, but it offers the best chances for overall survival when optimal cytoreduction is achieved. Clinicopathological and radiological models for predicting optimal resectability have not been universally applicable. Objective: To summarize the existing surgical data on current serologic, radiological, and surgical tools used to predict the resectability of advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: Systematic review of surgical studies on primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer reported in the English-language literature between 1980 and 2009. Results: Seventeen retrospective studies using cancer antigen 125, and8 retrospective studies using radiological imaging modalities to predict resectability of advanced ovarian cancer were reviewed. Five laparoscopic-based reports of ovarian cancer resectability were also reviewed as well as 5 studies examining the role of clinicopathological variables affecting surgical cytoreductive ability. These studies were analyzed according to the rate of optimal cytoreduction achieved and the reported sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values of predictive parameters described. Finally, the various conclusions were compared. Conclusions: The rates of optimal cytoreduction vary among surgeons. A universally applicable clinical model that can predict which patients will undergo optimal cytoreduction remains elusive. More research is needed to devise a set of uniform criteria that can be used to predict ovarian cancer resectability among different patient populations.",
keywords = "Cytoreduction, Ovarian cancer, Surgery outcome",
author = "Ibeanu, {Okechukwu A.} and Bristow, {Robert E.}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/IGC.0b013e3181cff38b",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
journal = "International Journal of Gynecological Cancer",
issn = "1048-891X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "SUPPL.1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting the outcome of cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer a review

AU - Ibeanu, Okechukwu A.

AU - Bristow, Robert E.

PY - 2010/1

Y1 - 2010/1

N2 - Introduction: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer-related mortality in the United States. Surgical cytoreduction is the cornerstone of current treatment in patients with advanced disease, but it offers the best chances for overall survival when optimal cytoreduction is achieved. Clinicopathological and radiological models for predicting optimal resectability have not been universally applicable. Objective: To summarize the existing surgical data on current serologic, radiological, and surgical tools used to predict the resectability of advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: Systematic review of surgical studies on primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer reported in the English-language literature between 1980 and 2009. Results: Seventeen retrospective studies using cancer antigen 125, and8 retrospective studies using radiological imaging modalities to predict resectability of advanced ovarian cancer were reviewed. Five laparoscopic-based reports of ovarian cancer resectability were also reviewed as well as 5 studies examining the role of clinicopathological variables affecting surgical cytoreductive ability. These studies were analyzed according to the rate of optimal cytoreduction achieved and the reported sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values of predictive parameters described. Finally, the various conclusions were compared. Conclusions: The rates of optimal cytoreduction vary among surgeons. A universally applicable clinical model that can predict which patients will undergo optimal cytoreduction remains elusive. More research is needed to devise a set of uniform criteria that can be used to predict ovarian cancer resectability among different patient populations.

AB - Introduction: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer-related mortality in the United States. Surgical cytoreduction is the cornerstone of current treatment in patients with advanced disease, but it offers the best chances for overall survival when optimal cytoreduction is achieved. Clinicopathological and radiological models for predicting optimal resectability have not been universally applicable. Objective: To summarize the existing surgical data on current serologic, radiological, and surgical tools used to predict the resectability of advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: Systematic review of surgical studies on primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer reported in the English-language literature between 1980 and 2009. Results: Seventeen retrospective studies using cancer antigen 125, and8 retrospective studies using radiological imaging modalities to predict resectability of advanced ovarian cancer were reviewed. Five laparoscopic-based reports of ovarian cancer resectability were also reviewed as well as 5 studies examining the role of clinicopathological variables affecting surgical cytoreductive ability. These studies were analyzed according to the rate of optimal cytoreduction achieved and the reported sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values of predictive parameters described. Finally, the various conclusions were compared. Conclusions: The rates of optimal cytoreduction vary among surgeons. A universally applicable clinical model that can predict which patients will undergo optimal cytoreduction remains elusive. More research is needed to devise a set of uniform criteria that can be used to predict ovarian cancer resectability among different patient populations.

KW - Cytoreduction

KW - Ovarian cancer

KW - Surgery outcome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=75749142309&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=75749142309&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/IGC.0b013e3181cff38b

DO - 10.1111/IGC.0b013e3181cff38b

M3 - Article

VL - 20

JO - International Journal of Gynecological Cancer

JF - International Journal of Gynecological Cancer

SN - 1048-891X

IS - SUPPL.1

ER -