Predicting, preventing and managing persistent pain after breast cancer surgery: the importance of psychosocial factors

Kristin L. Schreiber, Henrik Kehlet, Inna Belfer, Robert R. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) is increasingly recognized as a potential problem facing a sizeable subset of the millions of women who undergo surgery as part of their treatment of breast cancer. Importantly, an increasing number of studies suggest that individual variation in psychosocial factors such as catastrophizing, anxiety, depression, somatization and sleep quality play an important role in shaping an individual's risk of developing PPBCS. This review presents evidence for the importance of these factors and puts them within the context of other surgical, medical, psychophysical and demographic factors, which may also influence PPBCS risk, as well as discusses potential perioperative therapies to prevent PPBCS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-459
Number of pages15
JournalPain Management
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • breast cancer pain
  • catastrophizing
  • chronic post surgical pain
  • depression
  • post mastectomy pain
  • psychosocial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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