Precise probes of type II interferon activity define the origin of interferon signatures in target tissues in rheumatic diseases

John C. Hall, Livia Casciola-Rosen, Alan E. Berger, Efstathia K. Kapsogeorgou, Chris Cheadle, Athanasios G. Tzioufas, Alan N. Baer, Antony Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Elucidating the molecular pathways active in pathologic tissues has important implications for defining disease subsets, selecting therapy, and monitoring disease activity. The development of therapeutics directed at IFN-α or IFN-γ makes the discovery of probes that report precisely on the activity of different IFN pathways a high priority. We show that, although type I and II IFNs induce the expression of a largely overlapping group of molecules, precise probes of IFN-γ activity can be defined. Used in combination, these probes show prominent IFN-γ effects in Sjögren syndrome (SS) tissues. In contrast, dermatomyositis muscle shows a dominant type I IFN pattern. Interestingly, heterogeneity of IFN signatures exists in patients with SS, with some patients demonstrating a predominant type I pattern. The biochemical patterns largely distinguish the target tissues in patients with SS from those with dermatomyositis and provide a relative weighting of the effects of distinct IFN pathways in specific biopsies. In SS, type I and II IFN effects are localized to the same epithelial cells, surrounded by inflammatory cells expressing IFN-γ-induced proteins, suggesting reinforcing interactions. Precise probes of the different IFN pathways active in tissues of complex rheumatic diseases will be critical to classify disease, elucidate pathogenesis, and select therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17609-17614
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume109
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 23 2012

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Molecular pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Precise probes of type II interferon activity define the origin of interferon signatures in target tissues in rheumatic diseases'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this