Pre-departure Training for Healthcare Students Going Abroad: Impact on Preparedness

A. Gatebe Kironji, Jacob T. Cox, Jill Edwardson, Dane Moran, James Aluri, Bryn Carroll, Chi Chiung Grace Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Many medical and nursing schools offer opportunities for students to participate in global health experiences abroad, but little is known about the efficacy of pre-departure training in preparing students for these experiences. OBJECTIVES: The primary aim was to identify characteristics of pre-departure training associated with participants' reporting a high level of preparedness for their global health experiences. Secondary objectives included identifying students' preferred subjects of study and teaching modalities for pre-departure training. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all medical and nursing students at our institution from 2013 to 2015. Questions addressed prior global health experiences and pre-departure training, preferences for pre-departure training, and demographic information. Findings: Of 517 respondents, 55% reported having a prior global health experience abroad, 77% of whom felt prepared for their experience. Fifty-three percent received pre-departure training. Simply receiving pre-departure training was not associated with perceived preparedness, but pre-departure training in the following learning domains was: travel safety, personal health, clinical skills, cultural awareness, and leadership. Perceiving pre-departure training as useful was also independently associated with self-reported preparedness. Students' preferred instruction methods included discussion, lecture, and simulation, and their most desired subjects of study were travel safety (81%), cultural skills (87%), and personal health (82%). CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating travel safety, personal health, clinical skills, cultural awareness, and/or leadership into pre-departure training may increase students' preparedness for global health experiences. Student perceptions of the usefulness of pre-departure training is also associated with self-reported preparedness, suggesting a possible "buy-in" effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-691
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of global health
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2018

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Students
Delivery of Health Care
Clinical Competence
Safety
Health
Nursing Schools
Nursing Students
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Teaching
Demography
Global Health
Learning
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Pre-departure Training for Healthcare Students Going Abroad : Impact on Preparedness. / Kironji, A. Gatebe; Cox, Jacob T.; Edwardson, Jill; Moran, Dane; Aluri, James; Carroll, Bryn; Chen, Chi Chiung Grace.

In: Annals of global health, Vol. 84, No. 4, 05.11.2018, p. 683-691.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kironji, A. Gatebe ; Cox, Jacob T. ; Edwardson, Jill ; Moran, Dane ; Aluri, James ; Carroll, Bryn ; Chen, Chi Chiung Grace. / Pre-departure Training for Healthcare Students Going Abroad : Impact on Preparedness. In: Annals of global health. 2018 ; Vol. 84, No. 4. pp. 683-691.
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