Practicing what is preached: Congregational characteristics related to hiv testing behaviors and hiv discussions among black women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Through the current analysis, we aimed to better understand the relationship between congregational support and HIV prevention behaviors among a sample of high-risk, HIV-negative Black women. Participants were 434 Black women who were at high risk for contracting HIV through heterosexual sex. They were recruited from a city in the Mid-Atlantic region. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interviews. Results revealed three congregational characteristics were important for Black women's comfort level discussing HIV and their likelihood of returning for their HIV test results: feeling loved by their congregation, having ministries that helped people with their problems, and feeling listened to by their congregation. Thus, religious congregational support was a significant correlate of Black women's comfort discussing HIV prevention and treatment as well as their motivation to return to get their HIV test results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-378
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of community psychology
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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