Practice-based assessment of tobacco usage in southwestern primary care patients: A Research Involving Outpatient Settings Network (RIOS Net) study

Shawn Ralston, Nicole Kellett, Robert L. Williams, Cheryl Schmitt, Charles Q. North

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Primary care clinicians rely, perhaps erroneously, on general population-based data about risk factors to help form their strategies for allocating time in the brief primary care encounter. We conducted a case study using rates of tobacco usage among people presenting for primary care to explore comparability to general population-based rates. Methods: Clinicians in RIOS Net, a practice-based research network, gathered data on tobacco use for all patients presenting during a 2-week period. We compared those data to population-based data by gender and ethnicity. Results: Ninety-one primary care clinicians reported data on 2442 patients. Primary care smoking rates differed in important ways from general population-based rates. Hispanic women smoked at more than twice the national population-based rate (25% vs 12%). Youth smoked at higher rates as well, particularly young Native American men. Conclusions: Patients seen in primary care differ in important ways in rates and patterns of tobacco usage when compared with rates reported in population-based surveys. These differences could have important implications for preventive care within the context of multiple competing demands in the primary care encounter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-180
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Tobacco
Primary Health Care
Outpatients
Research
Population
Preventive Medicine
North American Indians
Tobacco Use
Hispanic Americans
Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this

Practice-based assessment of tobacco usage in southwestern primary care patients : A Research Involving Outpatient Settings Network (RIOS Net) study. / Ralston, Shawn; Kellett, Nicole; Williams, Robert L.; Schmitt, Cheryl; North, Charles Q.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.03.2007, p. 174-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: Primary care clinicians rely, perhaps erroneously, on general population-based data about risk factors to help form their strategies for allocating time in the brief primary care encounter. We conducted a case study using rates of tobacco usage among people presenting for primary care to explore comparability to general population-based rates. Methods: Clinicians in RIOS Net, a practice-based research network, gathered data on tobacco use for all patients presenting during a 2-week period. We compared those data to population-based data by gender and ethnicity. Results: Ninety-one primary care clinicians reported data on 2442 patients. Primary care smoking rates differed in important ways from general population-based rates. Hispanic women smoked at more than twice the national population-based rate (25{\%} vs 12{\%}). Youth smoked at higher rates as well, particularly young Native American men. Conclusions: Patients seen in primary care differ in important ways in rates and patterns of tobacco usage when compared with rates reported in population-based surveys. These differences could have important implications for preventive care within the context of multiple competing demands in the primary care encounter.",
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