Potential youth exposure to alcohol advertising on the internet: a study of internet versions of popular television programs

Michael Siegel, Rachel P. Kurland, Marisa Castrini, Catherine Morse, Alexander de Groot, Cynthia Retamozo, Sarah P. Roberts, Craig S. Ross, David H. Jernigan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: None of the previous papers has examined alcohol advertising on the internet versions of television programs popular among underage youth. Objectives: To assess the volume of alcohol advertising on web sites of television networks which stream television programs popular among youth. Methods: Multiple viewers analyzed the product advertising appearing on 12 television programs that are available in full episode format on the internet. During a baseline period of one week, six coders analyzed all 12 programs. For the nine programs that contained alcohol advertising, three underage coders (ages 10, 13, and 18) analyzed the programs to quantify the extent of that advertising over a four-week period. Results: Alcohol advertisements are highly prevalent on these programs, with nine of the 12 shows carrying alcohol ads, and six programs averaging at least one alcohol advertisement per episode. There was no difference in alcohol advertisement exposure for underage and legal age viewers. Conclusions: There is a substantial potential for youth exposure to alcohol advertising on the internet through internet-based versions of television programs. The Federal Trade Commission should require alcohol companies to report the underage youth and adult audiences for internet versions of television programs on which they advertise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Substance Use
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 14 2015

Fingerprint

popular television
television program
Television
Internet
alcohol
Alcohols
underage
United States Federal Trade Commission
legal age
television

Keywords

  • advertising
  • Alcohol
  • brand
  • internet
  • youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Potential youth exposure to alcohol advertising on the internet : a study of internet versions of popular television programs. / Siegel, Michael; Kurland, Rachel P.; Castrini, Marisa; Morse, Catherine; de Groot, Alexander; Retamozo, Cynthia; Roberts, Sarah P.; Ross, Craig S.; Jernigan, David H.

In: Journal of Substance Use, 14.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siegel, Michael ; Kurland, Rachel P. ; Castrini, Marisa ; Morse, Catherine ; de Groot, Alexander ; Retamozo, Cynthia ; Roberts, Sarah P. ; Ross, Craig S. ; Jernigan, David H. / Potential youth exposure to alcohol advertising on the internet : a study of internet versions of popular television programs. In: Journal of Substance Use. 2015.
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