Potential interaction between timing of infant complementary feeding and breastfeeding duration in determination of early childhood gut microbiota composition and BMI

Moira K. Differding, Myriam Doyon, Luigi Bouchard, Patrice Perron, Renée Guérin, Claude Asselin, Eric Massé, Marie France Hivert, Noel T. Mueller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Introducing complementary foods other than breastmilk or formula acutely changes the infant gut microbiota composition. However, it is unknown whether the timing of introduction to complementary foods (early vs. late) in infancy is associated with early childhood gut microbiota and BMI, and if these associations depend on breastfeeding duration. Objective: Our primary objective was to investigate whether timing of infant complentary feeding with solid foods is associated with early childhood gut microbiota composition and BMI-z, and whether these associations differ by duration of breastfeeding. Methods: We used data from a Canadian pre-birth cohort followed till age 5 years. We examined timing of introduction to solid foods with the gut microbiota, determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of stool collected at 5 years of age, and age-and-sex specific BMI-z. We conducted analyses before and after stratifying by breastfeeding duration, and adjusted for delivery mode, gestational age and birth weight. Results: Of the 392 children in the analysis, 109 (27.8%) had early (≤4 months) solids. The association between early (vs later) solids and BMI-z at 5 years was modified by breastfeeding status at 4 months (P =.06). Among children breastfed >4 months, early (vs later) solids were associated with differential relative abundance of 6 bacterial taxa, including lower Roseburia, and 0.30 higher BMI-z (95% CI: 0.05, 0.55) at 5 years. In children breastfed <4 months, early solids were associated with differential relative abundance of 9 taxa, but not with child BMI-z. Conclusions: Early (vs. later) introduction to solid foods in infancy is associated with altered gut microbiota composition and BMI in early childhood, however these associations differ by duration of breastfeeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12642
JournalPediatric Obesity
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

Keywords

  • childhood weight
  • complementary feeding
  • microbiome
  • obesity
  • paediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Health Policy
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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