Potential for intensive volunteering to promote the health of older adults in fair health

Jeremy Barron, Erwin J. Tan, Qilu Yu, Meilin Song, Sylvia McGill, Linda P Fried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Volunteer service opportunities for older adults may soon be expanded. Although volunteering is thought to provide health benefits for healthier older adults, it is not known whether older adults in less than very good health are suitable candidates for high-intensity volunteering and can derive health benefits. This manuscript presents a prospective analysis of 174 older adult volunteers serving in Experience Corps Baltimore®, a high-intensity senior volunteer program in Baltimore, Maryland. Volunteers served ≥15 h per week, for a full school year, in elementary schools helping children with reading and other skills between 1999 and 2002. Volunteers were assessed with standardized questionnaires and performance-based testing including grip strength, walking speed, chair stand speed, and stair-climbing speed prior to school volunteering and at the end of the school year. Results were stratified by health status. Among 174 volunteers, 55% initially reported "good" and 12% "fair" or "poor" health status. At baseline, those in fair health reported higher frequencies of disease and disability than volunteers in excellent or very good health. After volunteering, a majority of volunteers in every baseline health status category described increased strength and energy. Those in fair health were significantly more likely to display improved stair-climbing speed than those in good or excellent/very good health (100.0% vs. 53.4% vs. 37.5%, p∈=∈0.05), and many showed clinically significant increases in walking speed of >0.5 m/s. Satisfaction and retention rates were high for all health status groups. Clinicians should consider whether their patients in fair or good health, as well as those in better health, might benefit from high-intensity volunteer programs. Productive activity such as volunteering may be an effective community-based approach to health promotion for older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)641-653
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Health Fairs
Volunteers
Health
health
Health Status
health status
Insurance Benefits
Baltimore
school
status group
Hand Strength
Health Promotion
schoolchild
health promotion
elementary school
Reading
candidacy
disability
Disease

Keywords

  • Health status
  • Productive aging
  • Volunteering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Potential for intensive volunteering to promote the health of older adults in fair health. / Barron, Jeremy; Tan, Erwin J.; Yu, Qilu; Song, Meilin; McGill, Sylvia; Fried, Linda P.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 86, No. 4, 07.2009, p. 641-653.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barron, Jeremy ; Tan, Erwin J. ; Yu, Qilu ; Song, Meilin ; McGill, Sylvia ; Fried, Linda P. / Potential for intensive volunteering to promote the health of older adults in fair health. In: Journal of Urban Health. 2009 ; Vol. 86, No. 4. pp. 641-653.
@article{b57fb509be384019bdb6d659e2cdd196,
title = "Potential for intensive volunteering to promote the health of older adults in fair health",
abstract = "Volunteer service opportunities for older adults may soon be expanded. Although volunteering is thought to provide health benefits for healthier older adults, it is not known whether older adults in less than very good health are suitable candidates for high-intensity volunteering and can derive health benefits. This manuscript presents a prospective analysis of 174 older adult volunteers serving in Experience Corps Baltimore{\circledR}, a high-intensity senior volunteer program in Baltimore, Maryland. Volunteers served ≥15 h per week, for a full school year, in elementary schools helping children with reading and other skills between 1999 and 2002. Volunteers were assessed with standardized questionnaires and performance-based testing including grip strength, walking speed, chair stand speed, and stair-climbing speed prior to school volunteering and at the end of the school year. Results were stratified by health status. Among 174 volunteers, 55{\%} initially reported {"}good{"} and 12{\%} {"}fair{"} or {"}poor{"} health status. At baseline, those in fair health reported higher frequencies of disease and disability than volunteers in excellent or very good health. After volunteering, a majority of volunteers in every baseline health status category described increased strength and energy. Those in fair health were significantly more likely to display improved stair-climbing speed than those in good or excellent/very good health (100.0{\%} vs. 53.4{\%} vs. 37.5{\%}, p∈=∈0.05), and many showed clinically significant increases in walking speed of >0.5 m/s. Satisfaction and retention rates were high for all health status groups. Clinicians should consider whether their patients in fair or good health, as well as those in better health, might benefit from high-intensity volunteer programs. Productive activity such as volunteering may be an effective community-based approach to health promotion for older adults.",
keywords = "Health status, Productive aging, Volunteering",
author = "Jeremy Barron and Tan, {Erwin J.} and Qilu Yu and Meilin Song and Sylvia McGill and Fried, {Linda P}",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1007/s11524-009-9353-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "86",
pages = "641--653",
journal = "Journal of Urban Health",
issn = "1099-3460",
publisher = "Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential for intensive volunteering to promote the health of older adults in fair health

AU - Barron, Jeremy

AU - Tan, Erwin J.

AU - Yu, Qilu

AU - Song, Meilin

AU - McGill, Sylvia

AU - Fried, Linda P

PY - 2009/7

Y1 - 2009/7

N2 - Volunteer service opportunities for older adults may soon be expanded. Although volunteering is thought to provide health benefits for healthier older adults, it is not known whether older adults in less than very good health are suitable candidates for high-intensity volunteering and can derive health benefits. This manuscript presents a prospective analysis of 174 older adult volunteers serving in Experience Corps Baltimore®, a high-intensity senior volunteer program in Baltimore, Maryland. Volunteers served ≥15 h per week, for a full school year, in elementary schools helping children with reading and other skills between 1999 and 2002. Volunteers were assessed with standardized questionnaires and performance-based testing including grip strength, walking speed, chair stand speed, and stair-climbing speed prior to school volunteering and at the end of the school year. Results were stratified by health status. Among 174 volunteers, 55% initially reported "good" and 12% "fair" or "poor" health status. At baseline, those in fair health reported higher frequencies of disease and disability than volunteers in excellent or very good health. After volunteering, a majority of volunteers in every baseline health status category described increased strength and energy. Those in fair health were significantly more likely to display improved stair-climbing speed than those in good or excellent/very good health (100.0% vs. 53.4% vs. 37.5%, p∈=∈0.05), and many showed clinically significant increases in walking speed of >0.5 m/s. Satisfaction and retention rates were high for all health status groups. Clinicians should consider whether their patients in fair or good health, as well as those in better health, might benefit from high-intensity volunteer programs. Productive activity such as volunteering may be an effective community-based approach to health promotion for older adults.

AB - Volunteer service opportunities for older adults may soon be expanded. Although volunteering is thought to provide health benefits for healthier older adults, it is not known whether older adults in less than very good health are suitable candidates for high-intensity volunteering and can derive health benefits. This manuscript presents a prospective analysis of 174 older adult volunteers serving in Experience Corps Baltimore®, a high-intensity senior volunteer program in Baltimore, Maryland. Volunteers served ≥15 h per week, for a full school year, in elementary schools helping children with reading and other skills between 1999 and 2002. Volunteers were assessed with standardized questionnaires and performance-based testing including grip strength, walking speed, chair stand speed, and stair-climbing speed prior to school volunteering and at the end of the school year. Results were stratified by health status. Among 174 volunteers, 55% initially reported "good" and 12% "fair" or "poor" health status. At baseline, those in fair health reported higher frequencies of disease and disability than volunteers in excellent or very good health. After volunteering, a majority of volunteers in every baseline health status category described increased strength and energy. Those in fair health were significantly more likely to display improved stair-climbing speed than those in good or excellent/very good health (100.0% vs. 53.4% vs. 37.5%, p∈=∈0.05), and many showed clinically significant increases in walking speed of >0.5 m/s. Satisfaction and retention rates were high for all health status groups. Clinicians should consider whether their patients in fair or good health, as well as those in better health, might benefit from high-intensity volunteer programs. Productive activity such as volunteering may be an effective community-based approach to health promotion for older adults.

KW - Health status

KW - Productive aging

KW - Volunteering

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67650744284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67650744284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11524-009-9353-8

DO - 10.1007/s11524-009-9353-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 19488860

AN - SCOPUS:67650744284

VL - 86

SP - 641

EP - 653

JO - Journal of Urban Health

JF - Journal of Urban Health

SN - 1099-3460

IS - 4

ER -