Potential donor characteristics and decisions made by organ procurement organization staff: Results of a discrete choice experiment

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Abstract

Organ procurement organizations (OPOs) evaluate referrals for deceased organ donation in the United States. Efforts to expand the donor pool, such as the HIV organ policy equity (HOPE) Act that permits transplants from HIV-positive donors to HIV-positive recipients, can only succeed if OPOs pursue referrals. However, relatively little is known about how OPO staff evaluate referrals. To better understand this process, OPO staff completed a discrete choice experiment to quantify the relative importance of seven donor characteristics on the decision to pursue a theoretical donor. Relative importance was defined by Partworth utility using a hierarchical Bayesian conditional logit model. There were 51 respondents from 36 of 58 OPOs in the United States. Of the seven attributes, organ and tissue potential were the most influential, followed by age, type of death, HIV status, donor registration, and Hepatitis C status. To be preferred to an HIV-negative donor, an HIV-positive donor needed to have the potential to donate two additional organs. These data provide insight into the preferences of OPO referral staff and may help explain the lower than expected number of HIV-positive transplants performed since the passage of the HOPE Act.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13721
JournalTransplant Infectious Disease
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • HIV
  • HOPE Act
  • discrete choice experiment
  • organ procurement organization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Transplantation

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