Potato Consumption and Risk of Site-Specific Cancers in Adults: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

Manije Darooghegi Mofrad, Hadis Mozaffari, Mohammad Reza Askari, Mohammad Reza Amini, Alireza Jafari, Pamela J. Surkan, Leila Azadbakht

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The etiology of cancer type may vary significantly due to anatomy, embryology, and physiology of the cancer site. Although the association between potato consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC) was summarized in a 2018 meta-analysis of 5 cohort studies, to the best of our knowledge, no meta-analysis has evaluated potato consumption in relation to multiple cancer sites in adults. Medline/PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched for relevant publications through August 2020. We selected cohort or case-control studies conducted in adults that reported risk estimates (relative risk [RRs], HRs, and ORs) of potato intake for any cancer type. Random effects meta-analyses compared high and low intake categories. Twenty prospective cohort studies (total n = 785,348) including 19,882 incident cases, and 36 case-control studies (21,822 cases; 66,502 controls) were included. Among cohort studies, we did not find an association between high versus low intake of total potato (white and yellow) consumption and overall cancers: 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.11; tau2 = 0.005, n = 18). We found no relation between total potato consumption (high compared with low intake) and risk of CRC, pancreatic cancer, colon, gastric, breast, prostate, kidney, lung, or bladder cancer in cohort or case-control studies. We did not find an association between high versus low consumption of potato preparations (boiled/fried/mashed/roasted/baked) and risk of gastrointestinal-, sex-hormone-, or urinary-related cancers in cohort or case-control studies. Certainty of the evidence was low for total cancer, CRC, colon, rectal, renal, pancreatic, breast, prostate, and lung cancer and very low for gastric and bladder cancer. In conclusion, potato intake or potato preparations were not associated with multiple cancer sites when comparing high and low intake categories. This finding was consistent with the findings from the 2018 meta-analysis regarding potato intake and risk of CRC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1705-1722
Number of pages18
JournalAdvances in Nutrition
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021

Keywords

  • cancer
  • dose-response
  • meta-analysis
  • potato
  • systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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