Postnatal development of corticosteroid receptor immunoreactivity in the rat cerebellum and brain stem

Aaron Lawson, Rexford S. Ahima, Zygmunt Krozowski, Richard E. Harlan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The postnatal development of corticosteroid receptor immunoreactivity in the rat cerebellum and related brainstem nuclei was studied using a type I receptor antiserum, MINREC4, and a type 11 receptor monoclonal antibody, BUGR2. Type 1 receptor immunoreactive (ir) Purkinje cells were first observed at postnatal day 5 (P5), and increased to adult levels by P20.Type I-ir cells, presumably migrating granule cells, were observed in the developing molecular layer of the cerebellum at P5. By P30, the density of type I-ir cells in the definitive molecular and granular layers was still less than adult levels. In contrast, type I I-ir Purkinje cells were first observed at PI 5 and increased to adult levels by P20. No type I I-ir cells were observed in the proliferative and migratory zones of the molecular layer. By P30, the density of type I I-ir cells in the molecular and granular layers was far less than adult levels. In the deep cerebellar nuclei and most brain stem nuclei type I-ir was observed at P5 and developed to adult levels by P30. Type I I-ir was observed in the deep cerebellar nuclei, red and medial vestibular nuclei by PI5. The pontine and inferior olivary nuclei showed type I I-ir cells by P10. Type I I-ir in these regions developed to adult levels by P30. The earlier development of type I-ir suggests that the type I receptor may mediate the actions of corticosteroids in the cerebellum and related brain stem nuclei during early postnatal life. Both type I and type II corticosteroid receptors may mediate corticosteroid effects in the cerebellum and brain stem nuclei during late postnatal life and adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-707
Number of pages13
JournalNeuroendocrinology
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain Stem
  • Cerebellum
  • Glucocorticoids
  • Immunocytochemistry
  • Receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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