Posterior inferior cerebellar artery patency after flow-diverting stent treatment

M. R. Levitt, M. S. Park, F. C. Albuquerque, K. Moon, M. Y.S. Kalani, Cameron McDougall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The rate of PICA occlusion after flow-diverting stent placement for vertebral and vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms is not known. The purpose of this study is to determine the medium-term rate of PICA patency and risk factors for occlusion after such aneurysm treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients were identified who had vertebral or vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms and who were treated by placing a flow-diverting stent across the PICA ostium. Demographic and procedural factors associated with stent placement were recorded. Patency of the PICA was evaluated immediately after stent placement and on follow-up angiography. RESULTS: Thirteen patients with vertebral or vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms were treated in the study period, of whom 4 presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The average number of devices that spanned the PICA ostium was 1.77 (range, 1-3), with no immediate PICA occlusions. There were no postoperative strokes in the treated PICA territory, although there was 1 contralateral PICA-territory stroke of unclear etiology without clinical sequelae. In 11 patients with follow-up angiography at a mean of 10.6 months (range, 0.67-27.9 months), the PICA patency rate remained 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Flow-diverting stent placement across the PICA ostium in the treatment of vertebral and vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms may not result in immediate or midterm PICA occlusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-489
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

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