Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Neighborhood Residency and Satisfaction, and Social Network Characteristics among Underserved Women in Baltimore, Maryland

Kriti M. Jain, Melissa Davey-Rothwell, Norah L. Crossnohere, Carl A Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence is high, but not well-understood, among women living in urban, impoverished areas. Although previous studies have established social support as an important factor in PTSD development and maintenance, little is known about how perceptions of neighborhood are linked to PTSD. This study examined the relationship between PTSD and social network and neighborhood factors among women with a low socioeconomic status. Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from a human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted infection peer network study in Baltimore, Maryland (n = 438). We used bivariate analyses to examine the associations between PTSD and social network characteristics and time in neighborhood and satisfaction. We then constructed multivariable regression models that controlled for the following with PTSD: homelessness, cocaine/heroin use, and unemployment. Main Findings: Overall, 30% of women had PTSD symptom severity consistent with a clinical diagnosis. In the multivariable model, dissatisfaction with neighborhood block (odds ratio [OR], 1.80; p =.03) and living in one's neighborhood for more than 5 years (OR, 1.69; p =.03) were associated with PTSD. Social network factors that were significantly associated with PTSD included a higher number of network members in conflict with the participant (OR, 1.28; p =.02), presence of a network member who would let the participant stay with them (OR, 0.4; p =.004), and the number of network members with whom the participant socialized (OR, 0.6; p =.04). Conclusions: In this sample of impoverished urban women with a high prevalence of PTSD, duration of residency, satisfaction with neighborhood, and network characteristics were found to be strongly associated with PTSD symptom severity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-280
Number of pages8
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

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