Possible Prognostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis Who Underwent Percutaneous Balloon Compression: Report of Our Series and Literature Review

Nicola Montano, Simona Gaudino, Carolina Giordano, Fabrizio Pignotti, Eleonora Ioannoni, Alessandro Rapisarda, Alessandro Olivi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We studied the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with the prognosis of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)-related trigeminal neuralgia (TN) who had undergone percutaneous balloon compression (PBC). To the best of our knowledge, no studies have previously reported on this topic. We also performed a review of pertinent studies. Methods: From a surgical series of 82 patients with TN who had undergone PBC from January 2013 to June 2017, we identified 16 patients with MS (mean age, 54.81 ± 8.51 years; mean follow-up, 38.12 ± 19.86 months). Using brain MRI, we evaluated the presence of a lesion in the trigeminal nerve root entry zone and trigeminal nuclei. With other clinical and procedure-related factors, we studied its effect on acute pain relief (pain free at hospital discharge) and pain-free survival (PFS). Results: Of the 16 patients, 15 (93.75%) reported acute pain relief; 8 patients (50.00%) experienced a recurrence of pain. At the latest follow-up visit, an excellent outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 1–2) was obtained for 75% of patients and a good outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 3) for 25%. No patient experienced uncontrolled pain. The presence of a pear-like balloon shape during surgery (P = 0.0053) and a MRI detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway (P = 0.049) were associated with greater PFS. Conclusions: PBC can be efficient in treating MS-related TN. Some factors, such as a pear-like balloon shape during surgery and evidence of a MRI-detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway were associated with longer PFS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld neurosurgery
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Trigeminal Neuralgia
Multiple Sclerosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pyrus
Acute Pain
Survival
Trigeminal Nuclei
Pain
Trigeminal Nerve
Recurrence
Pain-Free
Brain

Keywords

  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Percutaneous balloon compression
  • Prognosis
  • Trigeminal neuralgia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Possible Prognostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis Who Underwent Percutaneous Balloon Compression : Report of Our Series and Literature Review. / Montano, Nicola; Gaudino, Simona; Giordano, Carolina; Pignotti, Fabrizio; Ioannoni, Eleonora; Rapisarda, Alessandro; Olivi, Alessandro.

In: World neurosurgery, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Montano, Nicola ; Gaudino, Simona ; Giordano, Carolina ; Pignotti, Fabrizio ; Ioannoni, Eleonora ; Rapisarda, Alessandro ; Olivi, Alessandro. / Possible Prognostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis Who Underwent Percutaneous Balloon Compression : Report of Our Series and Literature Review. In: World neurosurgery. 2019.
@article{4ea9182e32ff4efcaab840419d9be4ad,
title = "Possible Prognostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis Who Underwent Percutaneous Balloon Compression: Report of Our Series and Literature Review",
abstract = "Objective: We studied the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with the prognosis of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)-related trigeminal neuralgia (TN) who had undergone percutaneous balloon compression (PBC). To the best of our knowledge, no studies have previously reported on this topic. We also performed a review of pertinent studies. Methods: From a surgical series of 82 patients with TN who had undergone PBC from January 2013 to June 2017, we identified 16 patients with MS (mean age, 54.81 ± 8.51 years; mean follow-up, 38.12 ± 19.86 months). Using brain MRI, we evaluated the presence of a lesion in the trigeminal nerve root entry zone and trigeminal nuclei. With other clinical and procedure-related factors, we studied its effect on acute pain relief (pain free at hospital discharge) and pain-free survival (PFS). Results: Of the 16 patients, 15 (93.75{\%}) reported acute pain relief; 8 patients (50.00{\%}) experienced a recurrence of pain. At the latest follow-up visit, an excellent outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 1–2) was obtained for 75{\%} of patients and a good outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 3) for 25{\%}. No patient experienced uncontrolled pain. The presence of a pear-like balloon shape during surgery (P = 0.0053) and a MRI detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway (P = 0.049) were associated with greater PFS. Conclusions: PBC can be efficient in treating MS-related TN. Some factors, such as a pear-like balloon shape during surgery and evidence of a MRI-detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway were associated with longer PFS.",
keywords = "Magnetic resonance imaging, Multiple sclerosis, Percutaneous balloon compression, Prognosis, Trigeminal neuralgia",
author = "Nicola Montano and Simona Gaudino and Carolina Giordano and Fabrizio Pignotti and Eleonora Ioannoni and Alessandro Rapisarda and Alessandro Olivi",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.wneu.2019.01.134",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "World Neurosurgery",
issn = "1878-8750",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Possible Prognostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis Who Underwent Percutaneous Balloon Compression

T2 - Report of Our Series and Literature Review

AU - Montano, Nicola

AU - Gaudino, Simona

AU - Giordano, Carolina

AU - Pignotti, Fabrizio

AU - Ioannoni, Eleonora

AU - Rapisarda, Alessandro

AU - Olivi, Alessandro

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: We studied the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with the prognosis of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)-related trigeminal neuralgia (TN) who had undergone percutaneous balloon compression (PBC). To the best of our knowledge, no studies have previously reported on this topic. We also performed a review of pertinent studies. Methods: From a surgical series of 82 patients with TN who had undergone PBC from January 2013 to June 2017, we identified 16 patients with MS (mean age, 54.81 ± 8.51 years; mean follow-up, 38.12 ± 19.86 months). Using brain MRI, we evaluated the presence of a lesion in the trigeminal nerve root entry zone and trigeminal nuclei. With other clinical and procedure-related factors, we studied its effect on acute pain relief (pain free at hospital discharge) and pain-free survival (PFS). Results: Of the 16 patients, 15 (93.75%) reported acute pain relief; 8 patients (50.00%) experienced a recurrence of pain. At the latest follow-up visit, an excellent outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 1–2) was obtained for 75% of patients and a good outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 3) for 25%. No patient experienced uncontrolled pain. The presence of a pear-like balloon shape during surgery (P = 0.0053) and a MRI detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway (P = 0.049) were associated with greater PFS. Conclusions: PBC can be efficient in treating MS-related TN. Some factors, such as a pear-like balloon shape during surgery and evidence of a MRI-detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway were associated with longer PFS.

AB - Objective: We studied the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with the prognosis of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)-related trigeminal neuralgia (TN) who had undergone percutaneous balloon compression (PBC). To the best of our knowledge, no studies have previously reported on this topic. We also performed a review of pertinent studies. Methods: From a surgical series of 82 patients with TN who had undergone PBC from January 2013 to June 2017, we identified 16 patients with MS (mean age, 54.81 ± 8.51 years; mean follow-up, 38.12 ± 19.86 months). Using brain MRI, we evaluated the presence of a lesion in the trigeminal nerve root entry zone and trigeminal nuclei. With other clinical and procedure-related factors, we studied its effect on acute pain relief (pain free at hospital discharge) and pain-free survival (PFS). Results: Of the 16 patients, 15 (93.75%) reported acute pain relief; 8 patients (50.00%) experienced a recurrence of pain. At the latest follow-up visit, an excellent outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 1–2) was obtained for 75% of patients and a good outcome (Barrow Neurological Institute grade 3) for 25%. No patient experienced uncontrolled pain. The presence of a pear-like balloon shape during surgery (P = 0.0053) and a MRI detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway (P = 0.049) were associated with greater PFS. Conclusions: PBC can be efficient in treating MS-related TN. Some factors, such as a pear-like balloon shape during surgery and evidence of a MRI-detectable lesion in the trigeminal pathway were associated with longer PFS.

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Multiple sclerosis

KW - Percutaneous balloon compression

KW - Prognosis

KW - Trigeminal neuralgia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061973812&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061973812&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.01.134

DO - 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.01.134

M3 - Article

C2 - 30716488

AN - SCOPUS:85061973812

JO - World Neurosurgery

JF - World Neurosurgery

SN - 1878-8750

ER -