Positron emission tomography in the Rett syndrome: Clinical, biochemical and pathological correlates

S. Naidu, D. F. Wong, C. Kitt, G. Wenk, H. W. Moser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A consistent constellation of clinical signs and symptoms define the Rett syndrome, the most prominent of which are disorders of movement and tone. Preliminary pathologic and neurochemical data indicate predominant involvement of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and the cholinergic system of the basal forebrain region. The age of onset differentiates the Rett syndrome from Alzheimer and Parkinson disease with similar lesions. PET scanning makes it possible to relate the chemistry of the brain to function by measuring the number and affinity of neuroreceptors, metabolism in specific brain regions, and provide important determinants of the underlying mechanisms in disease states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S75-S79
JournalBrain and Development
Volume14
Issue numberSUPPL.
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Keywords

  • Dopamine receptors
  • PET scans
  • Rett syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

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