Positive reactions to tobacco predict relapse after cessation

David R. Strong, Adam M. Leventhal, Daniel P. Evatt, Suzanne Haber, Benjamin D. Greenberg, David Brian Abrams, Raymond Niaura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Among chronic smokers, individual differences in subjective reactions to smoking may characterize important facets of nicotine dependence that relate to abstinence-induced craving, withdrawal symptom profiles, and risk for relapse. Although the negative reinforcing properties of smoking have achieved prominent positions in models of relapse (Baker, Brandon, & Chassin, 2004), vulnerability to relapse risk may also arise from seeking positive reinforcement from smoking (Shiffman & Kirchner, 2009). In this study, 183 cessation-motivated smokers provided subjective craving, positive and negative reactions to standardized cigarettes following overnight abstinence. Level of craving, negative mood, and positive mood after overnight abstinence were significantly predictive of withdrawal on quit-day. Increased positive reactions to smoking were uniquely predictive of relapse after quitting (Hazard Ratio = 1.22, p <.001). Individual differences in positive reactions to smoking may be important markers of neurobiological systems that promote dependence and interfere with cessation efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1005
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume120
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tobacco
Smoking
Recurrence
Individuality
Tobacco Use Disorder
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Tobacco Products
Relapse
Craving
Individual Differences
Mood

Keywords

  • Positive affect
  • Smoking reinforcement
  • Smoking relapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Strong, D. R., Leventhal, A. M., Evatt, D. P., Haber, S., Greenberg, B. D., Abrams, D. B., & Niaura, R. (2011). Positive reactions to tobacco predict relapse after cessation. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 120(4), 999-1005. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0023666

Positive reactions to tobacco predict relapse after cessation. / Strong, David R.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Evatt, Daniel P.; Haber, Suzanne; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Abrams, David Brian; Niaura, Raymond.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 120, No. 4, 11.2011, p. 999-1005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strong, DR, Leventhal, AM, Evatt, DP, Haber, S, Greenberg, BD, Abrams, DB & Niaura, R 2011, 'Positive reactions to tobacco predict relapse after cessation', Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 120, no. 4, pp. 999-1005. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0023666
Strong DR, Leventhal AM, Evatt DP, Haber S, Greenberg BD, Abrams DB et al. Positive reactions to tobacco predict relapse after cessation. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 2011 Nov;120(4):999-1005. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0023666
Strong, David R. ; Leventhal, Adam M. ; Evatt, Daniel P. ; Haber, Suzanne ; Greenberg, Benjamin D. ; Abrams, David Brian ; Niaura, Raymond. / Positive reactions to tobacco predict relapse after cessation. In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 120, No. 4. pp. 999-1005.
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