Population frequency distributions of HDL, HDL2, and HDL3 cholesterol and apolipoproteins A-I and B in healthy men and women and associations with age, gender, hormonal status, and sex hormone use: The Stanford Five City Project

Christopher D. Gardner, Diane L. Tribble, Deborah Rohm Young, David Ahn, Stephen P. Fortmann

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Background. The purpose of this study is to present population-based frequency distribution data for several lipoprotein-related variables and to examine their associations with gender, age, menopausal status, and sex hormone use. Methods. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), HDL2-C, HDL3-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I, and Apo B were measured in a population-based sample of 1,027 healthy adults from four California cities who participated in the 1989-1990 survey of the Stanford Five City Project. These data were examined cross-sectionally with sociodemographic and other related variables. Results. Relative to men, all of the HDL-related parameters - HDL-C, HDL2-C, HDL3-C, Apo A-I - were significantly higher and Apo B levels were significantly lower among women (P < 0.001). Menopausal status was not associated with HDL-related parameters, but Apo B levels were higher in post- versus premenopausal women (P < 0.001). Among women, HDL-C and Apo A-I levels were higher in oral contraceptive and estrogen replacement therapy users (P = 0.003). Most of the significant findings remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking, energy expenditure, and alcohol intake. Conclusions. These population-based data indicate that gender, menopausal status, and the use of sex hormones among women are associated with differential levels of one or more of HDL-C, HDL2-C, HDL3-C, Apo A-I, and Apo B, independent of age and a broad set of lifestyle factors. (C) 2000 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)335-345
    Number of pages11
    JournalPreventive Medicine
    Volume31
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

    Keywords

    • Apolipoproteins
    • Diet
    • Epidemiology
    • Exercise
    • Hormones
    • Lifestyle
    • Lipids
    • Lipoprot eins
    • Men
    • Risk factors
    • Smoking
    • Women

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Epidemiology
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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