Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans

Thomas A. Glass, Carlos Mendes De Leon, Richard A. Marottoli, Lisa F. Berkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. To examine any association between social, productive, and physical activity and 13 year survival in older people. Design. Prospective cohort study with annual mortality follow up. Activity and other measures were assessed by structured interviews at baseline in the participants' homes. Proportional hazards models were used to model survival from time of initial interview. Setting. City of New Haven, Connecticut, United States. Participants. 2761 men and women from a random population sample of 2812 people aged 65 and older. Main outcome measure. Mortality from all causes during 13 years of follow up. Results. All three types of activity were independently associated with survival after age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, income, body mass index, smoking, functional disability, and history of cancer, diabetes, stroke, and myocardial infarction were controlled for. Conclusions. Social and productive activities that involve little or no enhancement of fitness lower the risk of all cause mortality as much as fitness activities do. This suggests that in addition to increased cardiopulmonary fitness, activity may confer survival benefits through psychosocial pathways. Social and productive activities that require less physical exertion may complement exercise programmes and may constitute alternative interventions for frail elderly people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-483
Number of pages6
JournalBMJ (Online)
Volume319
Issue number7208
StatePublished - Aug 21 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Survival
Population
Mortality
Interviews
Exercise
Physical Exertion
Frail Elderly
Marital Status
Proportional Hazards Models
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Smoking
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Glass, T. A., Mendes De Leon, C., Marottoli, R. A., & Berkman, L. F. (1999). Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans. BMJ (Online), 319(7208), 478-483.

Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans. / Glass, Thomas A.; Mendes De Leon, Carlos; Marottoli, Richard A.; Berkman, Lisa F.

In: BMJ (Online), Vol. 319, No. 7208, 21.08.1999, p. 478-483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glass, TA, Mendes De Leon, C, Marottoli, RA & Berkman, LF 1999, 'Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans', BMJ (Online), vol. 319, no. 7208, pp. 478-483.
Glass TA, Mendes De Leon C, Marottoli RA, Berkman LF. Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans. BMJ (Online). 1999 Aug 21;319(7208):478-483.
Glass, Thomas A. ; Mendes De Leon, Carlos ; Marottoli, Richard A. ; Berkman, Lisa F. / Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans. In: BMJ (Online). 1999 ; Vol. 319, No. 7208. pp. 478-483.
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