Poor Long-Term Outcomes of Keratopigmentation With Black Ink for the Treatment of Dysphotopsia Secondary to Laser Peripheral Iridotomies

Samir Jabbour, Johanna Choremis, Tanguy Boutin, Isabelle Brunette, Michèle Mabon, Julia C. Talajic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To report outcomes of keratopigmentation (KP) with commercial black ink in the treatment of dysphotopsia secondary to laser peripheral iridotomies (LPI) using manual anterior stromal puncture (ASP) and manual lamellar pocket (LP). METHODS: This is a retrospective case series of eyes that underwent KP for treatment of dysphotopsia secondary to LPI. Patients' postoperative symptoms were categorized as resolved, improved, no change, or worse. Any intraoperative and postoperative complications were noted, as well as the need for further treatments. RESULTS: Five eyes in 4 patients underwent ASP, and 14 eyes in 13 patients underwent LP. Only 1 patient had improvement in symptoms in the AK group. Four patients had a complete resolution of symptoms after LP, whereas 7 had symptomatic improvement and 3 did not notice any change. Fifty-five percent of patients in the LP group experienced late-onset depigmentation between 3 and 5 years postoperatively. One patient who underwent 2 LP re-treatments experienced irregular corneal steepening with nonprogressive corneal thinning. Overall, there were no serious adverse reactions to the pigment used. CONCLUSIONS: ASP was not suitable for the treatment of dysphotopsia secondary to LPI. In the short term, LP had good outcomes, but commercial black ink was prone to depigmentation at 3 to 5 years postoperatively. We therefore do not recommend the use of such pigment for long-term management of dysphotopsia secondary to LPI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1400-1405
Number of pages6
JournalCornea
Volume38
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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