POLYMICROBIAL AETIOLOGY OF TRAVELLERS' DIARRHOEA

DavidN Taylor, MartinJ Blaser, Neil Blacklow, Peter Echeverria, Chittima Pitarangsi, John Cross, BruceG Weniger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Of 35 US Peace Corps volunteers in Thailand, 20 (57%) had a total of 30 episodes of diarrhoea during their first 6 weeks in the country. Enteric pathogens were associated with 90% of the episodes. A single pathogen was identified in 17 (57%) episodes, 2-4 pathogens were identified in 10 (33%) episodes, and there were 15 symptomless infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was identified in 37% of these episodes, and various salmonella serotypes were isolated in 33%. Infections with 9 other enteric pathogens were also identified: Campylobacter jejuni (17%), Plesiomonas shigelloides (13%), Aeromonas hydrophila (10%), Blastocystis hominis (7%), Norwalk virus (7%), Vibrio parahaemolyticus(3%), non-01 Vibrio cholerae (3%), Vibrio fluvialis (3%), and rotavirus (3%). In total, 56 enteric infections were documented in 35 volunteers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-383
Number of pages3
JournalThe Lancet
Volume325
Issue number8425
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 16 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Diarrhea
Peace Corps
Volunteers
Norwalk virus
Plesiomonas
Infection
Blastocystis hominis
Vibrio parahaemolyticus
Aeromonas hydrophila
Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli
Campylobacter jejuni
Vibrio cholerae
Vibrio
Rotavirus
Thailand
Salmonella
Serogroup

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Taylor, D., Blaser, M., Blacklow, N., Echeverria, P., Pitarangsi, C., Cross, J., & Weniger, B. (1985). POLYMICROBIAL AETIOLOGY OF TRAVELLERS' DIARRHOEA. The Lancet, 325(8425), 381-383. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(85)91397-2

POLYMICROBIAL AETIOLOGY OF TRAVELLERS' DIARRHOEA. / Taylor, DavidN; Blaser, MartinJ; Blacklow, Neil; Echeverria, Peter; Pitarangsi, Chittima; Cross, John; Weniger, BruceG.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 325, No. 8425, 16.02.1985, p. 381-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, D, Blaser, M, Blacklow, N, Echeverria, P, Pitarangsi, C, Cross, J & Weniger, B 1985, 'POLYMICROBIAL AETIOLOGY OF TRAVELLERS' DIARRHOEA', The Lancet, vol. 325, no. 8425, pp. 381-383. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(85)91397-2
Taylor D, Blaser M, Blacklow N, Echeverria P, Pitarangsi C, Cross J et al. POLYMICROBIAL AETIOLOGY OF TRAVELLERS' DIARRHOEA. The Lancet. 1985 Feb 16;325(8425):381-383. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(85)91397-2
Taylor, DavidN ; Blaser, MartinJ ; Blacklow, Neil ; Echeverria, Peter ; Pitarangsi, Chittima ; Cross, John ; Weniger, BruceG. / POLYMICROBIAL AETIOLOGY OF TRAVELLERS' DIARRHOEA. In: The Lancet. 1985 ; Vol. 325, No. 8425. pp. 381-383.
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