Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Determinants of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide concentration and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study

Jonathan N. Hofmann, Linda M. Liao, Paul Timothy Strickland, Xiao Ou Shu, Gong Yang, Bu Tian Ji, Hong Lan Li, Nathaniel Rothman, Farin Kamangar, Yu Tang Gao, Wei Zheng, Wong Ho Chow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and colorectal cancer have been reported previously but few studies have characterized PAH exposure using biological measurements. We evaluated colorectal cancer risk in relation to urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide (1-OHPG), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolite, and assessed determinants of PAH exposure among controls in the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS).Methods: Concentrations of 1-OHPG were measured in spot urine samples collected from 343 colorectal cancer cases and 343 individually matched controls. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic characteristics and reported exposures. Odds ratios were calculated for risk of colorectal cancer in relation to quartiles of urinary 1-OHPG concentration. Potential determinants of natural log-transformed urinary 1-OHPG concentration were evaluated among a combined sample of controls from this study and another nested case-control study in the SWHS (Ntotal=652).Results: No statistically significant differences in risk of colorectal cancer by urinary 1-OHPG levels were observed. Among controls, the median (interquartile range) urinary 1-OHPG concentration was 2.01 pmol/mL (0.95-4.09). Active and passive smoking, using coal as a cooking fuel, eating foods that were cooked well done, and recent consumption of fried dough (e.g., yóutiáo) were associated with elevated levels of 1-OHPG, though only active smoking and fried dough consumption achieved statistical significance in multivariate analyses.Conclusions: This study does not provide evidence of an association between urinary levels of 1-OHPG and risk of colorectal cancer among women. Several environmental and dietary sources of PAH exposure were identified. Overall, the levels of 1-OHPG in this population of predominantly non-smoking women were considerably higher than levels typically observed among non-smokers in Europe, North America, and other developed regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number282
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 11 2013

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Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Women's Health
Colorectal Neoplasms
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Coal
Cooking
North America
1-hydroxypyrene-glucuronide
Case-Control Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Eating
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Demography
Urine
Food
Population

Keywords

  • 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide
  • China
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons : Determinants of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide concentration and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study. / Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Liao, Linda M.; Strickland, Paul Timothy; Shu, Xiao Ou; Yang, Gong; Ji, Bu Tian; Li, Hong Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kamangar, Farin; Gao, Yu Tang; Zheng, Wei; Chow, Wong Ho.

In: BMC Cancer, Vol. 13, 282, 11.06.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hofmann, Jonathan N. ; Liao, Linda M. ; Strickland, Paul Timothy ; Shu, Xiao Ou ; Yang, Gong ; Ji, Bu Tian ; Li, Hong Lan ; Rothman, Nathaniel ; Kamangar, Farin ; Gao, Yu Tang ; Zheng, Wei ; Chow, Wong Ho. / Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons : Determinants of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide concentration and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study. In: BMC Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 13.
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title = "Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Determinants of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide concentration and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study",
abstract = "Background: Associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and colorectal cancer have been reported previously but few studies have characterized PAH exposure using biological measurements. We evaluated colorectal cancer risk in relation to urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide (1-OHPG), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolite, and assessed determinants of PAH exposure among controls in the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS).Methods: Concentrations of 1-OHPG were measured in spot urine samples collected from 343 colorectal cancer cases and 343 individually matched controls. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic characteristics and reported exposures. Odds ratios were calculated for risk of colorectal cancer in relation to quartiles of urinary 1-OHPG concentration. Potential determinants of natural log-transformed urinary 1-OHPG concentration were evaluated among a combined sample of controls from this study and another nested case-control study in the SWHS (Ntotal=652).Results: No statistically significant differences in risk of colorectal cancer by urinary 1-OHPG levels were observed. Among controls, the median (interquartile range) urinary 1-OHPG concentration was 2.01 pmol/mL (0.95-4.09). Active and passive smoking, using coal as a cooking fuel, eating foods that were cooked well done, and recent consumption of fried dough (e.g., y{\'o}uti{\'a}o) were associated with elevated levels of 1-OHPG, though only active smoking and fried dough consumption achieved statistical significance in multivariate analyses.Conclusions: This study does not provide evidence of an association between urinary levels of 1-OHPG and risk of colorectal cancer among women. Several environmental and dietary sources of PAH exposure were identified. Overall, the levels of 1-OHPG in this population of predominantly non-smoking women were considerably higher than levels typically observed among non-smokers in Europe, North America, and other developed regions.",
keywords = "1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide, China, Colorectal cancer, Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons",
author = "Hofmann, {Jonathan N.} and Liao, {Linda M.} and Strickland, {Paul Timothy} and Shu, {Xiao Ou} and Gong Yang and Ji, {Bu Tian} and Li, {Hong Lan} and Nathaniel Rothman and Farin Kamangar and Gao, {Yu Tang} and Wei Zheng and Chow, {Wong Ho}",
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T1 - Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

T2 - Determinants of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide concentration and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study

AU - Hofmann, Jonathan N.

AU - Liao, Linda M.

AU - Strickland, Paul Timothy

AU - Shu, Xiao Ou

AU - Yang, Gong

AU - Ji, Bu Tian

AU - Li, Hong Lan

AU - Rothman, Nathaniel

AU - Kamangar, Farin

AU - Gao, Yu Tang

AU - Zheng, Wei

AU - Chow, Wong Ho

PY - 2013/6/11

Y1 - 2013/6/11

N2 - Background: Associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and colorectal cancer have been reported previously but few studies have characterized PAH exposure using biological measurements. We evaluated colorectal cancer risk in relation to urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide (1-OHPG), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolite, and assessed determinants of PAH exposure among controls in the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS).Methods: Concentrations of 1-OHPG were measured in spot urine samples collected from 343 colorectal cancer cases and 343 individually matched controls. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic characteristics and reported exposures. Odds ratios were calculated for risk of colorectal cancer in relation to quartiles of urinary 1-OHPG concentration. Potential determinants of natural log-transformed urinary 1-OHPG concentration were evaluated among a combined sample of controls from this study and another nested case-control study in the SWHS (Ntotal=652).Results: No statistically significant differences in risk of colorectal cancer by urinary 1-OHPG levels were observed. Among controls, the median (interquartile range) urinary 1-OHPG concentration was 2.01 pmol/mL (0.95-4.09). Active and passive smoking, using coal as a cooking fuel, eating foods that were cooked well done, and recent consumption of fried dough (e.g., yóutiáo) were associated with elevated levels of 1-OHPG, though only active smoking and fried dough consumption achieved statistical significance in multivariate analyses.Conclusions: This study does not provide evidence of an association between urinary levels of 1-OHPG and risk of colorectal cancer among women. Several environmental and dietary sources of PAH exposure were identified. Overall, the levels of 1-OHPG in this population of predominantly non-smoking women were considerably higher than levels typically observed among non-smokers in Europe, North America, and other developed regions.

AB - Background: Associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and colorectal cancer have been reported previously but few studies have characterized PAH exposure using biological measurements. We evaluated colorectal cancer risk in relation to urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide (1-OHPG), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolite, and assessed determinants of PAH exposure among controls in the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS).Methods: Concentrations of 1-OHPG were measured in spot urine samples collected from 343 colorectal cancer cases and 343 individually matched controls. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic characteristics and reported exposures. Odds ratios were calculated for risk of colorectal cancer in relation to quartiles of urinary 1-OHPG concentration. Potential determinants of natural log-transformed urinary 1-OHPG concentration were evaluated among a combined sample of controls from this study and another nested case-control study in the SWHS (Ntotal=652).Results: No statistically significant differences in risk of colorectal cancer by urinary 1-OHPG levels were observed. Among controls, the median (interquartile range) urinary 1-OHPG concentration was 2.01 pmol/mL (0.95-4.09). Active and passive smoking, using coal as a cooking fuel, eating foods that were cooked well done, and recent consumption of fried dough (e.g., yóutiáo) were associated with elevated levels of 1-OHPG, though only active smoking and fried dough consumption achieved statistical significance in multivariate analyses.Conclusions: This study does not provide evidence of an association between urinary levels of 1-OHPG and risk of colorectal cancer among women. Several environmental and dietary sources of PAH exposure were identified. Overall, the levels of 1-OHPG in this population of predominantly non-smoking women were considerably higher than levels typically observed among non-smokers in Europe, North America, and other developed regions.

KW - 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide

KW - China

KW - Colorectal cancer

KW - Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

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