Pneumoperitoneum secondary to cunnilingus

Shaukat A. Ashai, D. Lipton, A. Colon, J. R. Niebyl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 20 year old married woman was admitted to the emergency room with a history of abdominal pain of two hours' duration. A chest film revealed a large amount of free air under the diaphragm, but the abdominal film was otherwise normal. The patient gave the history that the onset of the pain had occurred after her husband had been blowing air into her vagina. Air embolism has been described during pregnancy in association with cunnilingus, specifically after blowing of air into the patient's vagina. Seven deaths have been reported from this cause. In the nonpregnant patient it requires a pressure of approximately 80 mm Hg to insufflate the Fallopian tubes with Rubin's cannula equipment. The authors determined that with the mouth blowing into the cannula, a pressure of 120 mm Hg can be achieved without difficulty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117
Number of pages1
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume295
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1976

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Pneumoperitoneum
Air
Vagina
Motion Pictures
Pressure
Air Embolism
Fallopian Tubes
Diaphragm
Spouses
Abdominal Pain
Mouth
Hospital Emergency Service
Thorax
History
Pain
Equipment and Supplies
Pregnancy
Cannula

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ashai, S. A., Lipton, D., Colon, A., & Niebyl, J. R. (1976). Pneumoperitoneum secondary to cunnilingus. New England Journal of Medicine, 295(2), 117.

Pneumoperitoneum secondary to cunnilingus. / Ashai, Shaukat A.; Lipton, D.; Colon, A.; Niebyl, J. R.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 295, No. 2, 1976, p. 117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ashai, SA, Lipton, D, Colon, A & Niebyl, JR 1976, 'Pneumoperitoneum secondary to cunnilingus', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 295, no. 2, pp. 117.
Ashai, Shaukat A. ; Lipton, D. ; Colon, A. ; Niebyl, J. R. / Pneumoperitoneum secondary to cunnilingus. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1976 ; Vol. 295, No. 2. pp. 117.
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