Vaccins antipneumococciques conjugués et hospitalisation des enfants atteints de pneumonie: Analyse d’une série chronologique en Afrique du Sud entre 2006 et 2014

Translated title of the contribution: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and hospitalization of children for pneumonia: A time-series analysis, South Africa, 2006–2014

Fatima Solomon, Fatima Solomon, Susan A. Nzenze, Azwifarwi Mudau, Elizabeth Zell, Katherine L O'Brien, Cynthia G. Whitney, Jennifer Verani, Michelle Groome, Shabir A. Madhi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To assess the impact of immunization with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations among children in Soweto, South Africa. Methods We used data collected at the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto between 2006 and 2014 – i.e. before and after April 2009, when a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was first included in South Africa’s routine immunization programme. Using a Bayesian generalized seasonal autoregressive moving-average model and the data collected in 2006–2008, we estimated the numbers of children that would have been hospitalized for pneumonia between 2010 and 2014 if no pneumococcal conjugate vaccines had been used. These estimates were then compared with the corresponding numbers of hospitalizations observed. Findings Between 2006 and 2014, 26 778 children younger than five years – including 3388 known to be infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) – were admitted to the study hospital for pneumonia. We estimated that, for the children known to be infected with HIV and for the other children, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines reduced the numbers of hospitalizations for pneumonia in 2014 by 33% (50% credible interval, CrI: 6 to 52) and 39% (50% CrI: 24 to 50), respectively. In the study hospital in 2012–2014, as a result of immunizations with these vaccines, there were an estimated 3100 fewer pneumonia hospitalizations of children younger than five years. Conclusion In our study hospital, following the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines into the national immunization programme, there were significant reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations among children.

Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)618-628
Number of pages11
JournalBulletin of the World Health Organization
Volume95
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Conjugate Vaccines
Pneumococcal Vaccines
South Africa
Pneumonia
Hospitalization
Immunization Programs
Immunization
HIV
Vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Vaccins antipneumococciques conjugués et hospitalisation des enfants atteints de pneumonie : Analyse d’une série chronologique en Afrique du Sud entre 2006 et 2014. / Solomon, Fatima; Solomon, Fatima; Nzenze, Susan A.; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Zell, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Katherine L; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Verani, Jennifer; Groome, Michelle; Madhi, Shabir A.

In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol. 95, No. 9, 01.09.2017, p. 618-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solomon, Fatima ; Solomon, Fatima ; Nzenze, Susan A. ; Mudau, Azwifarwi ; Zell, Elizabeth ; O'Brien, Katherine L ; Whitney, Cynthia G. ; Verani, Jennifer ; Groome, Michelle ; Madhi, Shabir A. / Vaccins antipneumococciques conjugués et hospitalisation des enfants atteints de pneumonie : Analyse d’une série chronologique en Afrique du Sud entre 2006 et 2014. In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2017 ; Vol. 95, No. 9. pp. 618-628.
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abstract = "Objective To assess the impact of immunization with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations among children in Soweto, South Africa. Methods We used data collected at the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto between 2006 and 2014 – i.e. before and after April 2009, when a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was first included in South Africa’s routine immunization programme. Using a Bayesian generalized seasonal autoregressive moving-average model and the data collected in 2006–2008, we estimated the numbers of children that would have been hospitalized for pneumonia between 2010 and 2014 if no pneumococcal conjugate vaccines had been used. These estimates were then compared with the corresponding numbers of hospitalizations observed. Findings Between 2006 and 2014, 26 778 children younger than five years – including 3388 known to be infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) – were admitted to the study hospital for pneumonia. We estimated that, for the children known to be infected with HIV and for the other children, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines reduced the numbers of hospitalizations for pneumonia in 2014 by 33{\%} (50{\%} credible interval, CrI: 6 to 52) and 39{\%} (50{\%} CrI: 24 to 50), respectively. In the study hospital in 2012–2014, as a result of immunizations with these vaccines, there were an estimated 3100 fewer pneumonia hospitalizations of children younger than five years. Conclusion In our study hospital, following the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines into the national immunization programme, there were significant reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations among children.",
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AU - Nzenze, Susan A.

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AU - O'Brien, Katherine L

AU - Whitney, Cynthia G.

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AB - Objective To assess the impact of immunization with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations among children in Soweto, South Africa. Methods We used data collected at the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto between 2006 and 2014 – i.e. before and after April 2009, when a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was first included in South Africa’s routine immunization programme. Using a Bayesian generalized seasonal autoregressive moving-average model and the data collected in 2006–2008, we estimated the numbers of children that would have been hospitalized for pneumonia between 2010 and 2014 if no pneumococcal conjugate vaccines had been used. These estimates were then compared with the corresponding numbers of hospitalizations observed. Findings Between 2006 and 2014, 26 778 children younger than five years – including 3388 known to be infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) – were admitted to the study hospital for pneumonia. We estimated that, for the children known to be infected with HIV and for the other children, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines reduced the numbers of hospitalizations for pneumonia in 2014 by 33% (50% credible interval, CrI: 6 to 52) and 39% (50% CrI: 24 to 50), respectively. In the study hospital in 2012–2014, as a result of immunizations with these vaccines, there were an estimated 3100 fewer pneumonia hospitalizations of children younger than five years. Conclusion In our study hospital, following the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines into the national immunization programme, there were significant reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations among children.

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