Plasma Levels of Estradiol, Testosterone, and DHEAS Do Not Predict Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in Men

CARLO S. CONTOREGGI, MARC R. BLACKMAN, REUBIN ANDRES, DENNIS C. MULLER, EDWARD G. LAKATTA, JEROME L. FLEG, S. MITCHELL HARMAN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Prior studies have reported men with coronary artery disease (CAD) to have elevated plasma levels of estrogens and reduced concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or DHEA‐sulfate (DHEAS). We investigated whether gonadal steroids or DHEAS are risk factors for CAD in men, using a prospective design, in a well characterized population studied at regular intervals. We studied 46 men (Cardiac group) who developed CAD and 124 men (Control group) who remained free of CAD (mean follow‐up, 9.5 years). We measured testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), and DHEAS, as well as plasma binding of T and E2, in samples stored before the onset of CAD (Cardiac group) or at matched times (Control group). Body mass index, blood pressure, and total serum cholesterol were measured at each visit. Both systolic blood pressure (SBP; P < 0.001) and cholesterol (P < 0.001) were increased in the Cardiac group, but no significant differences were found in total or free T or E2, the ratio of E2/T, or DHEAS between the two groups. The difference in cholesterol was significant only in men ≤65 years old (P < 0.001), and SBP only in men >65 years old (P < 0.005). Cholesterol (P < 0.05) and E2 (P < 0.001) appeared to decrease with age in the Cardiac, but not the Control, group. Moreover, total (P < 0.01) and free E2 (P < 0.05) were lower only in Cardiac men ≤55 years old. Correlations of SBP and cholesterol with steroid levels revealed only a weak inverse association of free T level with SBP (P < 0.03). These data suggest that in men, adrenal and gonadal steroids do not strongly influence CAD risk and that cholesterol and SBP are more important CAD risk factors in young and in old men, respectively. Moreover, our findings are consistent with those that indicate a cardioprotective role for endogenous E2 in men, as well as in women. 1990 American Society of Andrology

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)460-470
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of andrology
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Keywords

  • aging
  • androgens
  • cardiovascular disease
  • cardiovascular risk factors
  • estrogens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Endocrinology
  • Urology

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