Plasma adipokines and glycaemic progression among African Americans: Findings from the Jackson Heart Study

Arnaud D. Kaze, Solomon K. Musani, Aurelian Bidulescu, Joshua J. Joseph, Adolfo Correa, Chiadi Ericson Ndumele, Alain G. Bertoni, Rexford S. Ahima, Sherita H. Golden, Justin Echouffo Tcheugui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the association between plasma biomarkers including leptin, adiponectin, adiponectin-to-leptin ratio and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with risk of glycaemic progression and incident dysglycaemia (pre-diabetes or diabetes) in a community-based sample of African American (AAs). Methods: We analysed data from 3223 participants without type 2 diabetes at baseline (2000–2004) who attended ≥1 follow-up visit. Poisson regression was used to generate risk ratios (RRs) for glycaemic progression and incident dysglycaemia. Results: Over a median of 7 years, 46.4% developed glycaemic progression (n=1495). After adjusting for demographic and lifestyle variables, the RRs (95% CI) for glycaemic progression comparing highest (Q4) to lowest (Q1) quartiles were 1.30 (1.10–1.54), 0.74 (0.65–0.84), 0.70 (0.62–0.80) and 1.22 (1.07–1.38) for leptin, adiponectin, adiponectin–leptin ratio and hsCRP, respectively. Upon additional adjustment for BMI, the corresponding RRs (95% CIs) were 1.15 (0.94–1.42), 0.76 (0.67–0.86), 0.72 (0.62–0.84) and 1.14 (0.99–1.31) respectively. Among participants with normal glycaemia, the RRs (95% CIs) for incident pre-diabetes in Q4 vs Q1 were 1.37 (1.13–1.67), 0.73 (0.63–0.85), 0.70 (0.59–0.82) and 1.28 (1.10–1.48) for leptin, adiponectin, adiponectin–leptin ratio and hsCRP, respectively; equivalent RRs for incident diabetes were 5.15 (2.63–10.10), 0.36 (0.20–0.68), 0.21 (0.12–0.38) and 3.04 (1.70–5.44), respectively. Conclusions: In this large community-based cohort of AAs, our results suggest that high plasma leptin and hsCRP, as well as low adiponectin and adiponectin-to-leptin ratio, are associated with higher risks of glycaemic progression. The findings point to the potential utility of these biomarkers in predicting and preventing glycaemic progression in this high-risk population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDiabetic Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Adipokines
  • blacks
  • dysglycaemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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