Placement of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in paediatric and congenital heart defect patients: A pipeline for model generation and simulation prediction of optimal configurations

Lukas J. Rantner, Fijoy Vadakkumpadan, Philip J Spevak, Jane Crosson, Natalia A. Trayanova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is currently no reliable way of predicting the optimal implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement in paediatric and congenital heart defect (CHD) patients. This study aimed to: (1) develop a new image processing pipeline for constructing patient-specific heart-torso models from clinical magnetic resonance images (MRIs); (2) use the pipeline to determine the optimal ICD configuration in a paediatric tricuspid valve atresia patient; (3) establish whether the widely used criterion of shock-induced extracellular potential (Φe) gradients ≥5 V cm-1 in ≥95% of ventricular volume predicts defibrillation success. A biophysically detailed heart-torso model was generated from patient MRIs. Because transvenous access was impossible, three subcutaneous and three epicardial lead placement sites were identified along with five ICD scan locations. Ventricular fibrillation was induced, and defibrillation shocks were applied from 11 ICD configurations to determine defibrillation thresholds (DFTs). Two configurations with epicardial leads resulted in the lowest DFTs overall and were thus considered optimal. Three configurations shared the lowest DFT among subcutaneous lead ICDs. The Φe gradient criterion was an inadequate predictor of defibrillation success, as defibrillation failed in numerous instances even when 100% of the myocardium experienced such gradients. In conclusion, we have developed a new image processing pipeline and applied it to a CHD patient to construct the first active heart-torso model from clinical MRIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4321-4334
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume591
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

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Congenital Heart Defects
Implantable Defibrillators
Torso
Pediatrics
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Shock
Tricuspid Atresia
Ventricular Fibrillation
Myocardium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Placement of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in paediatric and congenital heart defect patients : A pipeline for model generation and simulation prediction of optimal configurations. / Rantner, Lukas J.; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Spevak, Philip J; Crosson, Jane; Trayanova, Natalia A.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 591, No. 17, 09.2013, p. 4321-4334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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