Place matters: Community level effects of women’s autonomy on ethiopian children’s immunization status

Jane O. Ebot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Over 75% of Ethiopian children are not fully immunized against infectious diseases and illnesses. Studies have shown that women’s autonomy, or decision-making abilities, is related to improvements in children’s health. Yet the extent to which community-context measures of women’s autonomy affect children’s health has yet to receive adequate attention. This study uses data from the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey to investigate the relationship between individual- and community-levels of women’s autonomy and children’s -- aged 12-30 months -- immunization status. The results of multilevel Poisson regression analysis show that community-level women’s autonomy is associated with an increased number of children’s immunizations above and beyond that of individual-level women’s autonomy. Overall, these results indicate that empowering women within households is not only an important mechanism through which improvements in children’s health can be made, but also serves as a way to improve the lives of other children within the community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1202-1215
Number of pages14
JournalEtude de la Population Africaine
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Autonomy
  • Children
  • Community
  • Ethiopia
  • Immunizations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Place matters: Community level effects of women’s autonomy on ethiopian children’s immunization status'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this