Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment

Andrea Louise Fielder, Antonina Mikocka-Walus, Stacey McCallum, Benjamin Stewart, Pasquale Alvaro, Adrian Esterman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a self-directed cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) booklet allowing immediate access to treatment for anxiety during alcohol use disorder (AUD) interventions. Design/methodology/approach – Parallel pilot randomised controlled trial: 69 individuals in AUD treatment, continued to receive treatment alone (control: n=29) or in addition, a self-directed, four week CBT booklet to manage anxiety (intervention: n=40). Primary outcome measures were changes in state (SAnx) and trait anxiety (TAnx) at four weeks. Secondary outcome measures were changes in adaptive (ACop), maladaptive (MCop) coping and quality of life (QoL, physical (PHQoL), psychological (PSQoL), social (SQoL), environment (EQoL)) at four weeks. Findings – Participants had significantly higher SAnx (p<0.01) and TAnx (p<0.01) baseline scores compared to the general population. There were no statistically significant group changes in SAnx or TAnx (p>0.05). Control group allocation predicted improvement in ACop (p<0.01), MCop (p<0.05), PHQoL (p<0.01), PSQoL (p<0.05) and SQoL (p<0.01); CBT group allocation predicted improvement in EQoL (p=0.05). All effect sizes were small to moderate (Cohen’s d<0.50). Percentage of book completion did not determine changes in anxiety, coping or quality of life. Originality/value – A four week self-directed CBT booklet did not significantly reduce anxiety during AUD treatment. Larger sample sizes will determine the most suitable treatment delivery mode for this type of CBT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-192
Number of pages14
JournalAdvances in Dual Diagnosis
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Anxiety
Alcohols
Pamphlets
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Social Environment
Sample Size
Randomized Controlled Trials
Psychology
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Anxiety
  • Brief
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy
  • Self-directed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

Fielder, A. L., Mikocka-Walus, A., McCallum, S., Stewart, B., Alvaro, P., & Esterman, A. (2015). Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment. Advances in Dual Diagnosis, 8(4), 179-192. https://doi.org/10.1108/ADD-05-2015-0008

Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment. / Fielder, Andrea Louise; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; McCallum, Stacey; Stewart, Benjamin; Alvaro, Pasquale; Esterman, Adrian.

In: Advances in Dual Diagnosis, Vol. 8, No. 4, 16.11.2015, p. 179-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fielder, AL, Mikocka-Walus, A, McCallum, S, Stewart, B, Alvaro, P & Esterman, A 2015, 'Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment', Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 179-192. https://doi.org/10.1108/ADD-05-2015-0008
Fielder AL, Mikocka-Walus A, McCallum S, Stewart B, Alvaro P, Esterman A. Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment. Advances in Dual Diagnosis. 2015 Nov 16;8(4):179-192. https://doi.org/10.1108/ADD-05-2015-0008
Fielder, Andrea Louise ; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina ; McCallum, Stacey ; Stewart, Benjamin ; Alvaro, Pasquale ; Esterman, Adrian. / Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment. In: Advances in Dual Diagnosis. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 179-192.
@article{9c63e27dfefc4844b08af25de29d8cb4,
title = "Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment",
abstract = "Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a self-directed cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) booklet allowing immediate access to treatment for anxiety during alcohol use disorder (AUD) interventions. Design/methodology/approach – Parallel pilot randomised controlled trial: 69 individuals in AUD treatment, continued to receive treatment alone (control: n=29) or in addition, a self-directed, four week CBT booklet to manage anxiety (intervention: n=40). Primary outcome measures were changes in state (SAnx) and trait anxiety (TAnx) at four weeks. Secondary outcome measures were changes in adaptive (ACop), maladaptive (MCop) coping and quality of life (QoL, physical (PHQoL), psychological (PSQoL), social (SQoL), environment (EQoL)) at four weeks. Findings – Participants had significantly higher SAnx (p<0.01) and TAnx (p<0.01) baseline scores compared to the general population. There were no statistically significant group changes in SAnx or TAnx (p>0.05). Control group allocation predicted improvement in ACop (p<0.01), MCop (p<0.05), PHQoL (p<0.01), PSQoL (p<0.05) and SQoL (p<0.01); CBT group allocation predicted improvement in EQoL (p=0.05). All effect sizes were small to moderate (Cohen’s d<0.50). Percentage of book completion did not determine changes in anxiety, coping or quality of life. Originality/value – A four week self-directed CBT booklet did not significantly reduce anxiety during AUD treatment. Larger sample sizes will determine the most suitable treatment delivery mode for this type of CBT.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Alcohol use disorder, Anxiety, Brief, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Self-directed",
author = "Fielder, {Andrea Louise} and Antonina Mikocka-Walus and Stacey McCallum and Benjamin Stewart and Pasquale Alvaro and Adrian Esterman",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1108/ADD-05-2015-0008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "179--192",
journal = "Advances in Dual Diagnosis",
issn = "1757-0972",
publisher = "Pier Professional Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pilot CBT trial for anxiety in alcohol use disorders treatment

AU - Fielder, Andrea Louise

AU - Mikocka-Walus, Antonina

AU - McCallum, Stacey

AU - Stewart, Benjamin

AU - Alvaro, Pasquale

AU - Esterman, Adrian

PY - 2015/11/16

Y1 - 2015/11/16

N2 - Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a self-directed cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) booklet allowing immediate access to treatment for anxiety during alcohol use disorder (AUD) interventions. Design/methodology/approach – Parallel pilot randomised controlled trial: 69 individuals in AUD treatment, continued to receive treatment alone (control: n=29) or in addition, a self-directed, four week CBT booklet to manage anxiety (intervention: n=40). Primary outcome measures were changes in state (SAnx) and trait anxiety (TAnx) at four weeks. Secondary outcome measures were changes in adaptive (ACop), maladaptive (MCop) coping and quality of life (QoL, physical (PHQoL), psychological (PSQoL), social (SQoL), environment (EQoL)) at four weeks. Findings – Participants had significantly higher SAnx (p<0.01) and TAnx (p<0.01) baseline scores compared to the general population. There were no statistically significant group changes in SAnx or TAnx (p>0.05). Control group allocation predicted improvement in ACop (p<0.01), MCop (p<0.05), PHQoL (p<0.01), PSQoL (p<0.05) and SQoL (p<0.01); CBT group allocation predicted improvement in EQoL (p=0.05). All effect sizes were small to moderate (Cohen’s d<0.50). Percentage of book completion did not determine changes in anxiety, coping or quality of life. Originality/value – A four week self-directed CBT booklet did not significantly reduce anxiety during AUD treatment. Larger sample sizes will determine the most suitable treatment delivery mode for this type of CBT.

AB - Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a self-directed cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) booklet allowing immediate access to treatment for anxiety during alcohol use disorder (AUD) interventions. Design/methodology/approach – Parallel pilot randomised controlled trial: 69 individuals in AUD treatment, continued to receive treatment alone (control: n=29) or in addition, a self-directed, four week CBT booklet to manage anxiety (intervention: n=40). Primary outcome measures were changes in state (SAnx) and trait anxiety (TAnx) at four weeks. Secondary outcome measures were changes in adaptive (ACop), maladaptive (MCop) coping and quality of life (QoL, physical (PHQoL), psychological (PSQoL), social (SQoL), environment (EQoL)) at four weeks. Findings – Participants had significantly higher SAnx (p<0.01) and TAnx (p<0.01) baseline scores compared to the general population. There were no statistically significant group changes in SAnx or TAnx (p>0.05). Control group allocation predicted improvement in ACop (p<0.01), MCop (p<0.05), PHQoL (p<0.01), PSQoL (p<0.05) and SQoL (p<0.01); CBT group allocation predicted improvement in EQoL (p=0.05). All effect sizes were small to moderate (Cohen’s d<0.50). Percentage of book completion did not determine changes in anxiety, coping or quality of life. Originality/value – A four week self-directed CBT booklet did not significantly reduce anxiety during AUD treatment. Larger sample sizes will determine the most suitable treatment delivery mode for this type of CBT.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Alcohol use disorder

KW - Anxiety

KW - Brief

KW - Cognitive behavioural therapy

KW - Self-directed

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84948166054&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84948166054&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/ADD-05-2015-0008

DO - 10.1108/ADD-05-2015-0008

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84948166054

VL - 8

SP - 179

EP - 192

JO - Advances in Dual Diagnosis

JF - Advances in Dual Diagnosis

SN - 1757-0972

IS - 4

ER -