Physiological Effects of Early Incremental Mobilization of a Patient with Acute Intracerebral and Intraventricular Hemorrhage Requiring Dual External Ventricular Drainage

Sowmya Kumble, Elizabeth K. Zink, Mackenzie Burch, Sandra Deluzio, Robert David Stevens, Mona Bahouth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Recent trials have challenged the notion that very early mobility benefits patients with acute stroke. It is unclear how cerebral autoregulatory impairments, prevalent in this population, could be affected by mobilization. The safety of mobilizing patients who have external ventricular drainage (EVD) devices for cerebrospinal fluid diversion and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is another concern due to risk of device dislodgment and potential elevation in ICP. We report hemodynamic and ICP responses during progressive, device-assisted mobility interventions performed in a critically ill patient with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) requiring two EVDs. Methods: A 55-year-old man was admitted to the Neuroscience Critical Care Unit with an acute thalamic ICH and complex intraventricular hemorrhage requiring placement of two EVDs. Progressive mobilization was achieved using mobility technology devices. Range of motion exercises were performed initially, progressing to supine cycle ergometry followed by incremental verticalization using a tilt table. Physiological parameters were recorded before and after the interventions. Results: All mobility interventions were completed without any adverse event or clinically detectable change in the patient’s neurological state. Physiological parameters including hemodynamic variables and ICP remained within prescribed goals throughout. Conclusion: Progressive, device-assisted early mobilization was feasible and safe in this critically ill patient with hemorrhagic stroke when titrated by an interdisciplinary team of skilled healthcare professionals. Studies are needed to gain insight into the hemodynamic and neurophysiological responses associated with early mobility in acute stroke to identify subsets of patients who are most likely to benefit from this intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalNeurocritical Care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 27 2017

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Early Ambulation
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Drainage
Intracranial Pressure
Equipment and Supplies
Hemodynamics
Stroke
Critical Illness
Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure
Ergometry
Patient Care Team
Intracranial Hypertension
Critical Care
Patient Safety
Neurosciences
Articular Range of Motion
Exercise
Hemorrhage
Technology
Population

Keywords

  • Early mobility
  • Intracerebral hemorrhage
  • Intracranial hypertension
  • Stroke
  • Supine cycle ergometry
  • Tilt table

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Physiological Effects of Early Incremental Mobilization of a Patient with Acute Intracerebral and Intraventricular Hemorrhage Requiring Dual External Ventricular Drainage",
abstract = "Background: Recent trials have challenged the notion that very early mobility benefits patients with acute stroke. It is unclear how cerebral autoregulatory impairments, prevalent in this population, could be affected by mobilization. The safety of mobilizing patients who have external ventricular drainage (EVD) devices for cerebrospinal fluid diversion and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is another concern due to risk of device dislodgment and potential elevation in ICP. We report hemodynamic and ICP responses during progressive, device-assisted mobility interventions performed in a critically ill patient with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) requiring two EVDs. Methods: A 55-year-old man was admitted to the Neuroscience Critical Care Unit with an acute thalamic ICH and complex intraventricular hemorrhage requiring placement of two EVDs. Progressive mobilization was achieved using mobility technology devices. Range of motion exercises were performed initially, progressing to supine cycle ergometry followed by incremental verticalization using a tilt table. Physiological parameters were recorded before and after the interventions. Results: All mobility interventions were completed without any adverse event or clinically detectable change in the patient’s neurological state. Physiological parameters including hemodynamic variables and ICP remained within prescribed goals throughout. Conclusion: Progressive, device-assisted early mobilization was feasible and safe in this critically ill patient with hemorrhagic stroke when titrated by an interdisciplinary team of skilled healthcare professionals. Studies are needed to gain insight into the hemodynamic and neurophysiological responses associated with early mobility in acute stroke to identify subsets of patients who are most likely to benefit from this intervention.",
keywords = "Early mobility, Intracerebral hemorrhage, Intracranial hypertension, Stroke, Supine cycle ergometry, Tilt table",
author = "Sowmya Kumble and Zink, {Elizabeth K.} and Mackenzie Burch and Sandra Deluzio and Stevens, {Robert David} and Mona Bahouth",
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AU - Stevens, Robert David

AU - Bahouth, Mona

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N2 - Background: Recent trials have challenged the notion that very early mobility benefits patients with acute stroke. It is unclear how cerebral autoregulatory impairments, prevalent in this population, could be affected by mobilization. The safety of mobilizing patients who have external ventricular drainage (EVD) devices for cerebrospinal fluid diversion and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is another concern due to risk of device dislodgment and potential elevation in ICP. We report hemodynamic and ICP responses during progressive, device-assisted mobility interventions performed in a critically ill patient with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) requiring two EVDs. Methods: A 55-year-old man was admitted to the Neuroscience Critical Care Unit with an acute thalamic ICH and complex intraventricular hemorrhage requiring placement of two EVDs. Progressive mobilization was achieved using mobility technology devices. Range of motion exercises were performed initially, progressing to supine cycle ergometry followed by incremental verticalization using a tilt table. Physiological parameters were recorded before and after the interventions. Results: All mobility interventions were completed without any adverse event or clinically detectable change in the patient’s neurological state. Physiological parameters including hemodynamic variables and ICP remained within prescribed goals throughout. Conclusion: Progressive, device-assisted early mobilization was feasible and safe in this critically ill patient with hemorrhagic stroke when titrated by an interdisciplinary team of skilled healthcare professionals. Studies are needed to gain insight into the hemodynamic and neurophysiological responses associated with early mobility in acute stroke to identify subsets of patients who are most likely to benefit from this intervention.

AB - Background: Recent trials have challenged the notion that very early mobility benefits patients with acute stroke. It is unclear how cerebral autoregulatory impairments, prevalent in this population, could be affected by mobilization. The safety of mobilizing patients who have external ventricular drainage (EVD) devices for cerebrospinal fluid diversion and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is another concern due to risk of device dislodgment and potential elevation in ICP. We report hemodynamic and ICP responses during progressive, device-assisted mobility interventions performed in a critically ill patient with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) requiring two EVDs. Methods: A 55-year-old man was admitted to the Neuroscience Critical Care Unit with an acute thalamic ICH and complex intraventricular hemorrhage requiring placement of two EVDs. Progressive mobilization was achieved using mobility technology devices. Range of motion exercises were performed initially, progressing to supine cycle ergometry followed by incremental verticalization using a tilt table. Physiological parameters were recorded before and after the interventions. Results: All mobility interventions were completed without any adverse event or clinically detectable change in the patient’s neurological state. Physiological parameters including hemodynamic variables and ICP remained within prescribed goals throughout. Conclusion: Progressive, device-assisted early mobilization was feasible and safe in this critically ill patient with hemorrhagic stroke when titrated by an interdisciplinary team of skilled healthcare professionals. Studies are needed to gain insight into the hemodynamic and neurophysiological responses associated with early mobility in acute stroke to identify subsets of patients who are most likely to benefit from this intervention.

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