Physiologic measures of nonhuman primates during physical restraint and chemical immobilization

M. Bush, R. Custer, J. Smeller, L. M. Bush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The arterial acid-base balance and other selected physiologic measures of physically restrained and chemically immobilized nonhuman primates from the families Callithricidae, Cebidae, Cercopithecidae, and Pongidae were compared. The physically restrained primates had significantly lower pH, pCO2, and base excess values, but they had significantly higher pO2 values, rectal temperatures, and pulse and respiration rates. Of 56 physically restrained primates, 30 (54%) experienced severe metabolic acidosis, with pH values less than 7.2; 15 (27% of total) had pH values less than 7.1. Two types of behavior were observed during the physical restraint of golden marmosets. Some of the marmosets were excited during restraint, with a great deal of struggling and vocalizing. The other marmosets were quiet and calm, with minimal struggling. The excited group had significantly lower pH, pCO2, and base excess values, but significantly higher pO2 values, rectal temperatures, and pulse and respiration rates. Primates immobilized with ketamine or tiletaminezolazepam had a near normal acid-base balance and were handled more easily than the physically restrained animals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)866-869
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume171
Issue number9
StatePublished - Dec 1 1977

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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