Physician race and ethnicity, professional satisfaction, and work-related stress: Results from the physician worklife study

M. Maria Glymour, Somnath Saha, Judyann Bigby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There are limited data about minority physicians' professional satisfaction and job stress. In this study, we describe by race and ethnicity, satisfaction, and job stress among a national sample of physicians. We analyzed data from 2,217 respondents to the Physicians' Worklife Survey (PWS), a career satisfaction survey of physicians drawn from the AMA Physician Masterfile. Scales measuring overall job and career satisfaction and work-related stress were constructed from Likert-response items. We examined the association between physician ethnicity and each of these scales. Respondents included 57 black, 134 Hispanic, 400 Asian or Pacific Islander, and 1,626 white physicians. In general, minority physicians appeared to serve a more demanding patient base than did white physicians. Hispanic physicians reported significantly higher job (p=0.05) and career (p=0.03) satisfaction compared to white physicians but no significant difference in stress. Asian or Pacific Islander physicians averaged lower job satisfaction (p=0.01) and higher stress (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1283-1294
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume96
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Career satisfaction
  • Ethnicity
  • Job stress
  • Physician job satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Physician race and ethnicity, professional satisfaction, and work-related stress: Results from the physician worklife study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this