Physician attitudes toward confidentiality of treatment for adolescents: Findings from the Upper Midwest Regional Physicians Survey

Michael David Resnick, Theodor J. Litman, Robert William Blum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The provision of confidential medical services to adolescents is an enduring health policy issue in the United States, and the focus of policy statements by several professional medical organizations. Physician attitudes toward confidential service provision to teenagers were examined in the Upper Midwest Regional Physician Survey, a representative sample of community-based pediatricians and family physicians. Overall, three-quarters of participants favored confidential service provision for youths. Multivariate analysis revealed that the most salient reasons for favoring confidentiality were perception of unique needs among adolescents, year of licensure, high self-assessed competency in addressing sexual concerns of adolescence, adequacy of training in interpersonal and sexual issues, frequency of addressing interpersonal issues, and lower self-assessed adequacy of training in traditional medical problems of youths. Implications for state and federal legislation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)616-622
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescent health Confidential physician treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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