Physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support

Casey Lynnette Overby, Angelika Ludtke Erwin, Noura S. Abul-Husn, Stephen B. Ellis, Stuart A. Scott, Aniwaa Owusu Obeng, Joseph L. Kannry, George Hripcsak, Erwin P. Bottinger, Omri Gottesman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS), prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx). We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII). The survey also includes items to measure physicians' characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness), attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT) services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS). The majority were residency program trainees (~88%). Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-49
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Clinical decision support
  • Clinician perceptions
  • Genomic medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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