Physical Function, Hyperuricemia, and Gout in Older Adults

Bridget Teevan Burke, Anna Köttgen, Andrew Law, Beverly Gwen Windham, Dorry Segev, Alan Baer, Josef Coresh, Mara Ann McAdams Demarco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Gout prevalence is high in older adults and those affected are at risk of physical disability, yet it is unclear whether they have worse physical function. Methods We studied gout, hyperuricemia, and physical function in 5,819 older adults (age ≥65 years) attending the 2011-2013 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study visit, a prospective US population-based cohort. Differences in lower extremity function (Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] and 4-meter walking speed) and upper extremity function (grip strength) by gout status and by hyperuricemia prevalence were estimated in adjusted ordinal logistic regression (SPPB) and linear regression (walking speed and grip strength) models. Lower scores or times signify worse function. The prevalence of poor physical performance (first quartile) by gout and hyperuricemia was estimated using adjusted modified Poisson regression. Results Ten percent of participants reported a history of gout and 21% had hyperuricemia. There was no difference in grip strength by history of gout (P = 0.77). Participants with gout performed worse on the SPPB test; they had 0.77 times (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.65, 0.90, P = 0.001) the prevalence odds of a 1-unit increase in SPPB score and were 1.18 times (95% CI 1.07, 1.32, P = 0.002) more likely to have poor SPPB performance. Participants with a history of gout had slower walking speed (mean difference -0.03; 95% CI -0.05, -0.01, P <0.001) and were 1.19 times (95% CI 1.06, 1.34, P = 0.003) more likely to have poor walking speed. Similarly, SPPB score and walking speed, but not grip strength, were worse in participants with hyperuricemia. Conclusion Older adults with gout and hyperuricemia are more likely to have worse lower extremity, but not upper extremity, function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1730-1738
Number of pages9
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume67
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Hyperuricemia
Gout
Hand Strength
Confidence Intervals
Upper Extremity
Lower Extremity
Linear Models
Atherosclerosis
Logistic Models
Walking Speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Physical Function, Hyperuricemia, and Gout in Older Adults. / Burke, Bridget Teevan; Köttgen, Anna; Law, Andrew; Gwen Windham, Beverly; Segev, Dorry; Baer, Alan; Coresh, Josef; McAdams Demarco, Mara Ann.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 67, No. 12, 01.12.2015, p. 1730-1738.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burke, Bridget Teevan ; Köttgen, Anna ; Law, Andrew ; Gwen Windham, Beverly ; Segev, Dorry ; Baer, Alan ; Coresh, Josef ; McAdams Demarco, Mara Ann. / Physical Function, Hyperuricemia, and Gout in Older Adults. In: Arthritis Care and Research. 2015 ; Vol. 67, No. 12. pp. 1730-1738.
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abstract = "Objective Gout prevalence is high in older adults and those affected are at risk of physical disability, yet it is unclear whether they have worse physical function. Methods We studied gout, hyperuricemia, and physical function in 5,819 older adults (age ≥65 years) attending the 2011-2013 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study visit, a prospective US population-based cohort. Differences in lower extremity function (Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] and 4-meter walking speed) and upper extremity function (grip strength) by gout status and by hyperuricemia prevalence were estimated in adjusted ordinal logistic regression (SPPB) and linear regression (walking speed and grip strength) models. Lower scores or times signify worse function. The prevalence of poor physical performance (first quartile) by gout and hyperuricemia was estimated using adjusted modified Poisson regression. Results Ten percent of participants reported a history of gout and 21{\%} had hyperuricemia. There was no difference in grip strength by history of gout (P = 0.77). Participants with gout performed worse on the SPPB test; they had 0.77 times (95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI] 0.65, 0.90, P = 0.001) the prevalence odds of a 1-unit increase in SPPB score and were 1.18 times (95{\%} CI 1.07, 1.32, P = 0.002) more likely to have poor SPPB performance. Participants with a history of gout had slower walking speed (mean difference -0.03; 95{\%} CI -0.05, -0.01, P <0.001) and were 1.19 times (95{\%} CI 1.06, 1.34, P = 0.003) more likely to have poor walking speed. Similarly, SPPB score and walking speed, but not grip strength, were worse in participants with hyperuricemia. Conclusion Older adults with gout and hyperuricemia are more likely to have worse lower extremity, but not upper extremity, function.",
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AU - Segev, Dorry

AU - Baer, Alan

AU - Coresh, Josef

AU - McAdams Demarco, Mara Ann

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AB - Objective Gout prevalence is high in older adults and those affected are at risk of physical disability, yet it is unclear whether they have worse physical function. Methods We studied gout, hyperuricemia, and physical function in 5,819 older adults (age ≥65 years) attending the 2011-2013 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study visit, a prospective US population-based cohort. Differences in lower extremity function (Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] and 4-meter walking speed) and upper extremity function (grip strength) by gout status and by hyperuricemia prevalence were estimated in adjusted ordinal logistic regression (SPPB) and linear regression (walking speed and grip strength) models. Lower scores or times signify worse function. The prevalence of poor physical performance (first quartile) by gout and hyperuricemia was estimated using adjusted modified Poisson regression. Results Ten percent of participants reported a history of gout and 21% had hyperuricemia. There was no difference in grip strength by history of gout (P = 0.77). Participants with gout performed worse on the SPPB test; they had 0.77 times (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.65, 0.90, P = 0.001) the prevalence odds of a 1-unit increase in SPPB score and were 1.18 times (95% CI 1.07, 1.32, P = 0.002) more likely to have poor SPPB performance. Participants with a history of gout had slower walking speed (mean difference -0.03; 95% CI -0.05, -0.01, P <0.001) and were 1.19 times (95% CI 1.06, 1.34, P = 0.003) more likely to have poor walking speed. Similarly, SPPB score and walking speed, but not grip strength, were worse in participants with hyperuricemia. Conclusion Older adults with gout and hyperuricemia are more likely to have worse lower extremity, but not upper extremity, function.

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