Physical and Organizational Job Stressors in Pregnancy and Associations With Primary Cesarean Deliveries

Sylvia Guendelman, Alison Gemmill, Nap Hosang, Leslie A. MacDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between exposure to physical and organizational job stressors during pregnancy and cesarean delivery. Methods: We sampled 580 employed women in California who participated in a nested population-based case-control study of birth outcomes. Adjusted multivariate regression analyses estimated associations between heavy lifting, frequent bending, high noise, extreme temperature, prolonged standing and organizational stressors (shift work, inflexible schedules, effort-reward ratio), and primary cesarean (vs vaginal) delivery, controlling for covariates. Results: Women occupationally exposed had higher odds of cesarean. Those exposed to daily manual lifting more than 15 pounds [adjusted odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.21 to 5.32] and at least four physical job stressors (adjusted odds ratio = 3.49; 95% CI 1.21 to 10.09) had significantly elevated odds of cesarean delivery. Exposed morbid women experienced greater risk; risk was lower among those with schedule flexibility. Conclusion: Associations were found between modifiable exposure to physical job stressors during pregnancy and cesarean delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)571-577
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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