Physical activity and pet ownership in year 3 of the Health ABC study

Roland J. Thorpe, Regina A. Kreisle, Lawrence T. Glickman, Eleanor M. Simonsick, Anne B. Newman, Stephen Kritchevsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pet ownership among older adults was investigated to determine whether dog owners were more likely to engage in physical activity than non-dog-pet or non-pet owners. The relationship between pet ownership and physical activity was examined using data from the Health ABC study. After age, race, education level, number of assets, family income, and site were adjusted for dog owners were more likely than non-pet owners to have engaged in non-exercise-related walking in the preceding week but did not differ from non-pet owners in walking for exercise or any physical activity. In contrast, non-dog-pet owners did not differ from non-pet owners in non-exercise-related walking in the preceding week and were less likely than non-pet owners to have engaged in walking for exercise or any physical activity in the preceding week. The activity-related benefits of pet ownership in older adults were limited to dog owners, who engaged in greater overall physical activity - non-exercise-related walking, in particular. Whether pet-related physical activity is sufficient to provide health benefits requires longitudinal investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-168
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Pets
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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